UQ graduate’s research provides relief for beef cattle

July 24, 2012

University of Queensland PhD graduate Stephanie Sinclair's research into the effects of dehorning beef cattle has led to a greater understanding of how to best relieve pain and promote faster healing for all breeds of cattle.

Dr Sinclair's research discovered that the Bos indicus cattle experienced stress and both during and after dehorning in the northern Australian .

This finding was in agreement with previous studies conducted on calves from the Bos taurus breed.

“Where my research findings were different was that I found that methods of pain alleviation previously successful for Bos taurus calves was not successful at mitigating the and pain experienced in and weaners from the Bos indicus breed,” Dr Sinclair said.

"This has implications for the implementation of local anaesthetics and analgesics as best practice for dehorning cattle of all breeds. Research into these issues is ongoing."

Her research contributes to improving the understanding of the impacts of dehorning and will ensure that industry can achieve best practice in managing the welfare of their animals to not only satisfy concerns from animal welfare groups and the wider community but also to get on with the demanding job of raising .

“I chose this research because I am actively involved in the beef industry and I wanted to be involved in applied research that would improve animal welfare and also be useful at the farm level,” she said.

Dr Sinclair's doctorate was very successful with her research receiving a number of awards including Australian Agricultural Industries Young Innovators and Scientists Award and Australian Society of Animal Production Young Members Travel Award.

She received her PhD degree during a graduation ceremony at UQ St Lucia campus on Friday, 20 July.

Explore further: Purdue starts Internet 'Beef Blog'

Related Stories

Breeding their horns off -- a winner

August 19, 2009

A team of scientists led by CSIRO's Dr Kishore Prayaga has been awarded a prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prize for its work to develop a simple genetic test which has the potential to end the need to dehorn cattle in ...

Can naturally raised beef find its place in the industry?

October 18, 2010

As consumer demand for naturally raised beef continues to increase, researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered that naturally raised beef can be produced effectively for this niche market as long as a substantial ...

Recommended for you

Genomes uncover life's early history

August 24, 2015

A University of Manchester scientist is part of a team which has carried out one of the biggest ever analyses of genomes on life of all forms.

Rare nautilus sighted for the first time in three decades

August 25, 2015

In early August, biologist Peter Ward returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The University of Washington professor had seen what he considers ...

Why a mutant rice called Big Grain1 yields such big grains

August 24, 2015

(Phys.org)—Rice is one of the most important staple crops grown by humans—very possibly the most important in history. With 4.3 billion inhabitants, Asia is home to 60 percent of the world's population, so it's unsurprising ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.