New study identifies success factors of extraordinary CIOs

Jul 30, 2012

A just completed multi-year research project by the Fisher CIO Leadership Program at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business has uncovered the most important, role specific career success factors of chief information officers.

The study was initiated by Max Hopper, the iconic author of industry-changing SABRE system and conducted by the Fisher CIO Leadership Program. Hopper was concerned that so many companies were failing to achieve much if any benefit from their expensive IT organizations, often after spending large amounts of money with little to show for it. He formed a committee to identify the world's more successful CIOs – those few who had a major, enduring positive impact both on their companies as well as their industries.

A Fisher Program team interviewed in depth each of the fourteen prominent CIOs identified by the Hopper Committee. The companies represented included American Airlines, WalMart, Charles Schwab, FedEX, Marriott, Levi Strauss, FritoLay, Cisco and several others.

An event discussing the findings of this ground-breaking study will take place at UC-Berkeley's Haas School of Business on September 14th and will be attended by most of the CIOs who were interviewed as well as by CIOs and individuals in related professions.

Explore further: Study looks at stock market performance of polarizing brands

More information: "The Renaissance CIO Project: the Invisible Factors of Extraordinary Success," published in the Winter 2012 issue of the California Management Review (CMR), www.ucpressjournals.com/journal.php?j=cmr

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Squirrel
not rated yet Jul 30, 2012
Where is the beef?--"event discussing the findings of this ground-breaking study will take place".

Where is the logical link--"Hopper was concerned that so many companies were failing to achieve much if any benefit from their expensive IT organizations, often after spending large amounts of money with little to show for it. He formed a committee to identify the world's more successful CIOs"

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