Optimizing a novel superconducting material

Jul 24, 2012
Optimizing a novel superconducting material
Credit: Thinkstock

Superconducting materials are widely used in the electrical instrumentation industry. European researchers made significant progress in enhancing superconductivity of a novel material currently the focus of worldwide interest.

The unique property of superconductors, essentially no resistance to current flow (almost ideal ), makes them attractive for a wide variety of existing and future applications.

Conventional superconductors achieve their special properties when supercooled to near absolute with expensive cryogenic liquid (such as or helium) cooling. High-temperature superconductors (HTSs), on the other hand, exhibit these properties at relatively – very cold but much less relative to conventional .

While HTSs eliminate the need for expensive cooling procedures, one main drawback has been the brittleness of associated materials. This makes it difficult to manufacture flexible wires, increasing labour costs and wasted material.

Magnesium diboride (MgB2), a recently discovered superconducting material with the highest known transition temperature (at which it becomes superconducting) has generated much enthusiasm.

MgB2 could become the superconducting material of choice in numerous medium-range magnetic field applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). European companies already play a dominant role in MRI and the use of low-cost MgB2 could substantially enhance European competitiveness in a large global market.

In addition, the energy sector, in particular related to liquid hydrogen, could move ahead substantially thanks to financial, environmental and functionality benefits afforded by the use of MgB2.

EU researchers initiated the Hipermag project to enhance the performance of MgB2 and thus increase commercial applicability and market penetration. Researchers successfully optimised the microstructure of precursor powders, demonstrating enhanced superconducting properties of carbon-doped nanosized precursors and wires (monofilamentary tapes).

They then developed powder processing techniques leading to development of multifilamentary conductors housed in metallic sheaths. The materials provided the enhanced mechanical stability lacking until now.

Researchers also improved current-carrying capabilities, employing a variety of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to determine the preferred orientation of MgB2 crystallites. Finally, they evaluated the stability of the superconductors in magnetic fields, explaining novel experimental results with theoretical descriptions.

MgB2 is an intriguing superconducting material with numerous potential uses. Limitations to its commercial exploitation were partially overcome via research carried out by the Hipermag consortium. Future applications include medical imaging and renewable energy.

Explore further: Impurity size affects performance of emerging superconductive material

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axemaster
not rated yet Jul 24, 2012
Magnesium diboride (MgB2), a recently discovered superconducting material with the highest known transition temperature (at which it becomes superconducting) has generated much enthusiasm.

Wow, this article really fails when it comes to accuracy. MgB2 is a conventional superconductor, discovered in 2001, and its critical temperature is 39K. Far from the highest - for example YBCO (Type-II superconductor) has a critical temp of 92K. Given that liquid nitrogen only goes down to 77K, MgB2 would require liquid helium coolant, meaning any machine using it would be both incredibly bulky and expensive to run.

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