NASA's TRMM satellite eyeing Tropical Storm Khanun's rainfall

Jul 17, 2012
RMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) data were used to give a 3-D view of Khanun's rainfall structure of Khanun on July 17, 2012, at 0439 UTC. The 3-D view showed that powerful convective storms near Khanun's center were pushing to heights of about 17 km (~10.6 miles). Credit: Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is keeping an eye on the rainfall being generated by Tropical Storm Khanun as it moves past Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan.

The had an excellent daytime look at Tropical Storm Khanun near Okinawa in the northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 17, 2012 at 0439 UTC (12:39 a.m. EDT/1:39 p.m. Japan). Khanun had estimated wind speeds of over 40 knots (~46 mph) at the time TRMM passed overhead. The storm was compact but well organized and shows possible eye wall formation. The bulk of the strongest precipitation was occurring in the western semi-circle of the storm.

TRMM's (PR) data were used to give a 3-D view of Khanun's rainfall structure. The 3-D view showed that powerful convective storms near Khanun's center were pushing to heights of about 17 kilometers (~10.6 miles).

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on July 17, Khanun's had increased to 50 knots (57.5 mph/92.6 kmh). It was located about 95 nautical miles (109 miles/176 km) north-northeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, near 27.8 North and 128.2 East. Khanun was moving to the northwest near 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kmh). Tropical-storm-force winds extend out to 60 nautical miles (69 miles/111 km) from the center of circulation, so Kadena Air Base was not yet experiencing susatained at that time.

Khanun is predicted to slightly increase in power today. It is expected to affect both South and North Korea as it moves northward through the western side of the Yellow Sea over the next couple days.

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