Interpol wildlife operation results mark Global Tiger Day

Jul 30, 2012
Rhinoceros horns are displayed in Hong Kong's customs and excise department offices in 2011. Interpol marked Global Tiger Day Sunday by announcing the results of an operation to help save the endangered species that saw 40 arrests and the seizure of big cat skins and other body parts.

Interpol marked Global Tiger Day Sunday by announcing the results of an operation to help save the endangered species that saw 40 arrests and the seizure of big cat skins and other body parts.

Operation Prey, conducted across Bhutan, China, India and Nepal, has also so far led to the seizure of other wildlife goods such as rhino horns, ivory and as well as protected flora, the global policing body said.

"The range of goods recovered during an operation primarily aimed at tiger protection again shows that criminals will target any animal and any plant to make a profit," Interpol's David Higgins said in a statement.

Interpol's Programme coordinated Operation Prey, which involved police, customs, environmental agencies, narcotics bureaux, forest protection authorities, and prosecutors.

The operation was conducted under the umbrella of Project Predator, an initiative created by France-based Interpol that covers the 13 countries in Asia where can still be found.

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