For India, 'God particle' is as much boson as Higgs

Jul 04, 2012
An undated handout graphic distributed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva shows a representation of a proton-proton collision event measured in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience in the search for the Higgs boson.

The release Wednesday of dramatic new data pointing to the existence of the Higgs boson "God particle" sent a special flutter of pride, mixed with frustration, through India's scientific community.

The "Higgs" of is well known to refer to Peter Higgs, the British researcher who in 1964 laid much of the conceptual groundwork for the presence of the .

What is largely unknown, at least to non-specialists, is that the term "boson" owes its name to the pioneering work of the late Indian physicist, Satyendra Nath Bose.

Born during British colonial rule in 1894 in Calcutta (now Kolkata), Bose was a lecturer at both the universities of Calcutta and Dhaka.

In 1924, he sent a paper to Albert Einstein describing a statistical model that eventually led to the discovery of what became known as the Bose-Einstein condensate phenomenon.

The paper laid the basis for describing the two fundamental classes of sub-atomic particles -- bosons, named after Bose, and fermions, after the Italian physicist .

While several Nobel prizes have been awarded research related to the concepts of the boson, Bose himself was never honoured by the Nobel academy.

Archan Majumdar, an astrophysicist at the eponymous Satyendra Nath Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences in Kolkata, said Bose's name would be better known if his discoveries hadn't been made during the colonial era.

"If India had been an independent nation he could have got more recognition than he has," Majumdar said.

"Also, if he had the which he deserved more than many others he would have been more known, but unfortunately it didn't happen."

In 1954 Bose awarded the Padma Vibhushan -- India's second highest civilian honour. He died in 1974.

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flashgordon
4.7 / 5 (3) Jul 04, 2012
this is very immature and trying to put carots over people's heads to make them feel better when it's not even needed(bosons are named after this guys work;hence, what's the problem?) This is what religions are all about; this is what they do; this is their problem.
rwinners
not rated yet Jul 05, 2012
Funny, isn't it? And also so sad.

OTOH, If you asked a scientist about this affront to India, they'd probably respond.... "huh?"
Gigel
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
Hey, they just love their scientists and pride on them, that's all. It would be nice if every person that has graduated school could do that.