Human eye inspires clog-free ink jet printer invention

Jul 16, 2012

Clogged printer nozzles waste time and money while reducing print quality. University of Missouri engineers recently invented a clog-preventing nozzle cover by mimicking the human eye.

"The cover we invented was inspired by the ," said Jae Wan Kwon, associate professor in the College of Engineering. "The eye and an ink jet nozzle have a common problem: they must not be allowed to dry while, simultaneously, they must open. We used biomimicry, the imitation of nature, to solve human problems."

Kwon's invention uses a droplet of silicone oil to cover the opening of the nozzle when not in use, similar to the film of oil that keeps a of tears from evaporating off the eye. On the surface of the human eye, eyelids spread the film of oil over the layer of tears. However, at the tiny scale of the ink jet nozzle, mechanical shutters like eyelids would not work, as they would be stuck in place by . Instead, the droplet of oil for the nozzle is easily moved in and out of place by an electric field.

Kwon said this invention could make home and office printers less wasteful. To clear a clogged nozzle in most ink jet printers, a burst of fresh ink breaks through the crust of dried ink which forms if the machine isn't used constantly. Over time this cleaning operation can waste a large amount of expensive ink. Kwon's invention eliminates the need to waste that squirt of ink.

"Other printing devices use similar mechanisms to ink jet printers," Kwon said. "Adapting the clog-free nozzle to these machines could save businesses and researchers thousands of dollars in wasted materials. For example, printers, which may someday be capable of fabricating , squirt out living cells to form . Those cells are so expensive that researchers often find it cheaper to replace the nozzles rather than waste the cells. Clog-free nozzles would eliminate the costly replacements."

Similarly, rapid prototyping systems used by engineers and product designers emit streams of liquid plastic through nozzles like those on an inkjet printer. The thick, sticky liquid used in the devices can make it necessary to replace the whole nozzle when they become clogged. These specialty printer parts can cost thousands of dollars.

MU engineering doctoral student Riberet Almieda worked with Kwon on the oil droplet nozzle cover. A paper documenting the discovery was published in the Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems.

Explore further: Comfortable climate indoors with porous glass

Related Stories

Silent nozzle extinguisher does not harm hard disks

Sep 26, 2011

Siemens has developed a very quiet nozzle for gas extinguishing systems. The system is especially suitable for use in computer centers that store sensitive data. That’s because loud noise can cause hard ...

Company solves gas nozzle dripping problem

Jun 08, 2012

(Phys.org) -- One of the hallmarks of the human race has been the myriad ways that single individuals or small groups respond when noting problems big and small. They may see something as a challenge or a ...

Recommended for you

Comfortable climate indoors with porous glass

17 hours ago

Proper humidity and temperature play a key role in indoor climate. In the future, establishing a comfortable indoor environment may rely on porous glass incorporated into plaster, as this regulates moisture ...

Crash-testing rivets

17 hours ago

Rivets have to reliably hold the chassis of an automobile together – even if there is a crash. Previously, it was difficult to predict with great precision how much load they could tolerate. A more advanced ...

Customized surface inspection

17 hours ago

The quality control of component surfaces is a complex undertaking. Researchers have engineered a high-precision modular inspection system that can be adapted on a customer-specific basis and integrated into ...

Sensors that improve rail transport safety

17 hours ago

A new kind of human-machine communication is to make it possible to detect damage to rail vehicles before it's too late and service trains only when they need it – all thanks to a cloud-supported, wireless ...

Tiny UAVs and hummingbirds are put to test

Jul 30, 2014

Hummingbirds in nature exhibit expert engineering skills, the only birds capable of sustained hovering. A team from the US, British Columbia, and the Netherlands have completed tests to learn more about the ...

User comments : 0