Faster simulation -- award for new method

Jul 13, 2012
This is a simulation model of a automobile wheel, generated with Dominik Schillinger's new method. Credit: Copyright: TUM

Computer simulations have become an indispensable part of the modern design process. Standard finite element technology, however, requires designers to carry out a time-consuming and often error-prone mesh generation step that transfers the computer-aided design (CAD) model into the simulation model.

Dominik Schillinger has created a novel simulation concept that enables direct integration of the CAD geometry into the , completely circumventing any mesh generation. The applicability of this technology in engineering practice was successfully tested with CAD models, for example, of a ship propeller and an automobile wheel.

The omission of mesh generation could reduce the overall analysis time with respect to standard finite elements by more than 80%. The new technology is expected to strongly influence the current design process in mechanical, automotive, aerospace and civil engineering over the next decade.

Dominik Schillinger was honored this week at the World Congress on Computational Mechanics in São Paulo for his paper "An Isogeometric Design-through-analysis Methodology based on Adaptive Hierarchical Refinement of NURBS, Immersed Boundary Methods, and T-spline CAD Surfaces" in the journal "Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering."

He was a scholar of the Munich Centre of Advanced Computing (MAC) until May. MAC bundles together research activities related to computational science and engineering at TUM and other institutions in Munich. Doctoral candidates at MAC are members of TUM's International Graduate School of Science and Engineering (IGSSE).

Schillinger worked on his method during his research stay at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) in Austin (USA), financed by "MAC@IGSSE," in collaboration with the TUM institute for Computation in Engineering.

Explore further: PsiKick's batteryless sensors poised for coming 'Internet of things'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Software promises more efficient design process

Mar 02, 2006

Mechanical engineers at Purdue University have developed software that promises to increase the efficiency of creating parts for everything from cars to computer hardware by making it possible to quickly evaluate and optimize ...

Making the most of your CT scan

Jan 30, 2012

X-ray photography has been used for decades for medical purposes. Now, scientists have found new ways of obtaining precise and comprehensive data from x-ray computer tomography. In the project BIO-CT-EXPLOIT, ...

Recommended for you

Large streams of data warn cars, banks and oil drillers

Apr 16, 2014

Better warning systems that alert motorists to a collision, make banks aware of the risk of losses on bad customers, and tell oil companies about potential problems with new drilling. This is the aim of AMIDST, the EU project ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...