EU push for car CO2 cuts faces industry, green flak

July 11, 2012
Cars drive in front of an information board asking not to drive faster than 20km/h due to pollution on a boulevard of the northern French city of Lille. The European Commission pushed Wednesday for cuts in automobile carbon emissions but environmentalists said the plans did not go far enough while car makers warned that it would hurt the industry.

The European Commission pushed Wednesday for cuts in automobile carbon emissions but environmentalists said the plans did not go far enough while car makers warned that it would hurt the industry.

European Union Climate Action Commissioner Connie Hedegaard issued proposals to slash the average emissions in new cars from 135.7 grammes of CO2 per kilometre to 95 grammes in 2020.

"With our proposals we are not only protecting the climate and saving consumers money, we are also boosting innovation and competitiveness in the European automotive industry," she said.

"And we will create substantial numbers of jobs as a result. This is a clear win-win situation for everyone," she said.

Hedegaard defended the plan as "fair and balanced," denying that concessions were made to car manufacturers.

But the environmentalist group Greenpeace accused the commission of diluting the proposed vehicle efficiency standards under pressure from the auto industry.

"These proposed efficiency standards bear the fingerprints of the car lobby," said Greenpeace's EU transport policy director Franziska Achterberg.

Greenpeace charged that an "accounting trick" was used to calculate average fleet emissions, which would allow to sell more polluting cars.

The European ' Association (ACEA) said it would work with its members, which include giants such as BMW, Europe and General Motors Europe, to analyse the feasibility of the targets.

"These are tough targets -- the toughest in the world," said ACEA secretary general Ivan Hodac.

"Indeed, contrary to some claims, the proposed targets for the European fleet are far more stringent than those in the US, China or Japan," he said.

"This will increase manufacturing costs in Europe, creating a competitive disadvantage for the region and further slowing the renewal of the fleet."

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Howhot
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 12, 2012
But the environmentalist group Greenpeace accused the commission of diluting the proposed vehicle efficiency standards under pressure from the auto industry.


I just don't get the auto industry. Just engineer a good fuel efficient engine and move on.
Shootist
2 / 5 (4) Jul 12, 2012
"What is important about CO2 is that those with the right lobbyists get rich, and the regulatory environment keeps upstart startup companies from competing with big important corporations. Capitalists will always conspire with government to restrict entry into their fields of endeavor. Always." - Jerry Pournelle - http://www.jerrypournelle.com
Shootist
2 / 5 (4) Jul 12, 2012
But the environmentalist group Greenpeace accused the commission of diluting the proposed vehicle efficiency standards under pressure from the auto industry.


I just don't get the auto industry. Just engineer a good fuel efficient engine and move on.


Their current engines are fine. Screw greenpeas.
Howhot
4 / 5 (1) Jul 12, 2012
Greenpeace accused the commission of diluting the proposed vehicle efficiency standards


Go Greenpeace! Without the pressure from Greenpeace Shootist, cars fuel efficiency would stagnate. It's a good thing that the greens are pushing.

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