Taking a bird's eye view could cut wildlife collisions with aircraft

Jul 09, 2012

Using lights to make aircraft more visible to birds could help reduce the risk of bird strikes, new research by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has found. The study, which examined how Canada geese responded to different radio-controlled model aircraft, is the first of its kind and is published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology.

Aircraft collisions with wildlife – primarily – is a serious and growing threat to civil and military aviation, as well as an expensive one: bird strikes cost civil aviation alone more than $1.2 billion a year world-wide.

Although almost all efforts to prevent bird strikes focus on the airport environment, the fate of US Airways flight 1549 – which was forced to make a dramatic landing in the Hudson River in New York in 2009 after several were sucked into its engines – shows that effectively reducing bird strikes requires developing strategies that work far beyond the airport perimeter.

Now, a team of researchers from the USDA, Indiana State University and Purdue University, is taking a bird's eye view of the problem. According to Dr Bradley Blackwell of the USDA's National Wildlife Research Center: "Birds see so much differently than humans do, so we cannot translate our own perceptual understanding to the problem of birds avoiding aircraft."

Using knowledge about birds' visual systems, the team tested the response of Canada geese to three radio-controlled aircraft: the first with lights off, the second with lights on, and the third painted to resemble a bird of prey.

They found geese respond more quickly to the threat of an approaching model aircraft when its lights were on, making it more visible to the birds.

The study also found that the geese were just as cautious of the standard radio-controlled aircraft as the predator model, an important finding. According to Dr Blackwell: "Because Canada will respond to aircraft approach as a potential threat, the theory behind how animals respond to predators is very applicable to understanding the response to aircraft approach, and we can enhance this response via lighting."

The research – the first to combine visual sensory ecology with anti-predator behaviour – could set the aviation industry on the right track to developing lighting systems that will reduce the rate of bird strikes.

Next, the team hopes to expand their understanding of the visual ecology of other bird species commonly struck by aircraft, so they can design aircraft lighting that will be seen by a range of species. "This is only the first step. As well as lighting, we also want to understand how to manipulate paint schemes so that birds find them easier to detect. It's exciting work," he says.

Explore further: 'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size

More information: Bradley F Blackwell et al (2012). 'Exploiting avian vision with aircraft lighting to reduce bird strikes', doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2012.02165.x, is published in the Journal of Applied Ecology on Tuesday 10 July 2012. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2664.2012.02165.x/abstract

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Novel audio telescope heeds call of the wild... birds

Nov 09, 2006

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Intelligent Automation, Inc. (Rockville, Md.) and the University of Missouri-Columbia have modified a NIST-designed microphone array to make an "audio ...

Conflict with farmers threaten geese

Feb 15, 2006

A Netherlands Institute of Ecology scientist in Yerseke says the survival of pink-footed geese is being endangered by a conflict with farmers.

Bad news for us, or just for the birds?

Jan 11, 2011

Roughly 5,000 dead and dying blackbirds fell from the Arkansas sky on New Year's Eve. That mysterious event was followed by the appearance of about 500 dead birds along a Louisiana highway and additional bird-falls in Kentucky, ...

New research to help safer emergency aircraft landings

Jan 05, 2012

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) aviation researchers are developing an information system to help Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) make safer emergency landings and better enable their wider commercial use.

Recommended for you

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PhotonX
not rated yet Jul 10, 2012
I thought US Airways flight 1549 happened during daytime, no? I thought at first the article was talking about nighttime, but then I guess there wouldn't be a lot of migratory birds up and about then.
.
More lights, maybe. Or maybe they should take a page from the World War 2 P-40s and paint a giant maw on the front of the planes. Seeing what they might think of as the biggest eagle of their lives should be enough to make a flight of geese unload their collective droppings. Just try not to be underneath when it happens....