US research vessel winds down visit to Vietnam as part of joint oceanographic research program

Jun 27, 2012
The R/V Roger Revelle, an auxiliary general purpose oceanographic research vessel (AGOR 28), is owned by the US Office of Naval Research (ONR) and operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The vessel is visiting Vietnam June 22-29, highlighting the partnership between ONR and the Vietnamese Ministry of Science and Technology as part of a five-year research endeavor, the Joint Vietnam-US Research Program on the Oceanography of the Vietnamese East Sea and Land-Ocean Interaction. Credit: US Navy photo

U.S. scientists and Vietnamese researchers will discuss coastal ocean circulation and land-ocean environmental trends this week as the R/V Roger Revelle, an auxiliary general purpose oceanographic research vessel (AGOR 28), continues its nine-day port call in the city of Da Nang.

Owned by the (ONR) and operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the advanced research vessel arrived in Vietnam on June 22. Its visit highlights partnership between ONR and the Vietnamese Ministry of Science and Technology as part of a five-year research endeavor, the Joint Vietnam-U.S. Research Program on the Oceanography of the Vietnamese East Sea and Land-Ocean Interaction.

The R/V Roger Revelle, an auxiliary general purpose oceanographic research vessel (AGOR 28) owned by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is making a nine-day port call in the city of Da Nang, Vietnam. The US and Vietnam are working on a five-year oceanographic research program that will pair U.S. scientists from leading universities and research institutions to execute joint research on the complex ocean dynamics of the Vietnamese East Sea and its interactions with the Mekong River. Credit: US Navy photo

ONR promotes scientific research and technology development on behalf of the U.S. Navy. The five-year oceanographic research program will pair U.S. scientists from leading universities and to execute joint research on the complex ocean dynamics of the Vietnamese East Sea and its interactions with the . The program also will include training; exchanges between U.S. and Vietnamese scientists and university students; and joint publication of research results in international, peer-reviewed journals.

"The circulation and structure of the Vietnamese East Sea is strongly driven by monsoon winds and precipitation," said Scott Harper, ONR program manager for the project. "This leads to interesting seasonal variability that can be hard to model or predict without a good basic understanding of the physical processes involved. Through this project, we will be able to improve forecasts from our integrated weather, wave and in the Western Pacific, which will enable safer and more efficient naval operations."

Harper added that it will be interesting to see if global change has impacted the region's oceanography in any way, and to explore what changes might be expected in the future.

"Science expands our knowledge of the world and deepens our understanding of each other," said David B. Shear, U.S. ambassador to the country. "This program will strengthen relationships between the U.S. and Vietnamese scientific communities and provide key information to help Vietnam address pressing environmental challenges, such as climate change."

Explore further: Images released of shipwreck in San Francisco Bay

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Pacific Ocean floor to be explored

Jul 17, 2006

Scientists prepared Monday to explore the seafloor near Papua New Guinea in the western Pacific Ocean with remotely operated underwater vehicles.

Bird flu kills one in Vietnam

Jun 18, 2007

Bird flu has killed a 20-year-old Vietnamese man in the country's first confirmed avian flu case in two years, it was reported Sunday.

Undersea warriors, undersea medicine: The future force

May 15, 2012

U.S. Navy divers take on dangerous tasks every day—and starting this week, they will be part of a multinational effort near Estonia to help clear the Baltic Sea of underwater mines left over from as long ago as the First ...

Recommended for you

NASA sees last vestiges of Tropical Depression Jack

16 hours ago

Tropical Cyclone Jack had weakened to a tropical depression when NASA and JAXA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed above on April 22, 2014 at 1120 UTC/7:20 a.m. EDT.

New discovery helps solve mystery source of African lava

20 hours ago

Floods of molten lava may sound like the stuff of apocalyptic theorists, but history is littered with evidence of such past events where vast lava outpourings originating deep in the Earth accompany the breakup ...

Climate change likely to make Everest even riskier

20 hours ago

Climbing to the roof of the world is becoming less predictable and possibly more dangerous, scientists say, as climate change brings warmer temperatures that may eat through the ice and snow on Mount Everest.

User comments : 0

More news stories

On global warming, settled science and George Brandis

The Australian Attorney General, Senator George Brandis is no stranger to controversy. His statement in parliament that "people do have a right to be bigots" rapidly gained him notoriety, and it isn't hard to understand why ...

When things get glassy, molecules go fractal

Colorful church windows, beads on a necklace and many of our favorite plastics share something in common—they all belong to a state of matter known as glasses. School children learn the difference between ...

FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes.