Urban wasteland: World Bank sees global garbage crisis

Jun 07, 2012 by Veronica Smith
This file photo shows a 'Norcal Waste' worker moving bins with trash and recyclable waste in San Francisco, California, in 2009. The world's city dwellers are fast producing more and more trash in a "looming crisis" that will pose huge financial and environmental burdens, according to the World Bank.

The world's city dwellers are fast producing more and more trash in a "looming crisis" that will pose huge financial and environmental burdens, the World Bank is warning.

Urban specialists said the growing pile of trash from urban dwellers is as daunting as and the costs will be especially high in , mainly in Africa.

In a report on "a relatively silent problem that is growing daily," released on Wednesday, the World Bank estimated city dwellers will generate a waste pile of 2.2 billion tonnes a year by 2025, up 70 percent from today's level of 1.3 billion tonnes.

In the meantime, the cost of solid waste management is projected to soar to $375 billion a year, from the current $205 billion.

Billing the report, "What a Waste: A Global Review of Solid Waste Management" as the first worldwide comprehensive look at trash, the World Bank warned the data points to crisis ahead, as living standards rise and urban populations soar.

"The challenges surrounding municipal solid waste are going to be enormous, on a scale of, if not greater than, the challenges we are currently experiencing with ," said Dan Hoornweg, a senior urban specialist at the development lender and co-author of the report.

This file photo shows refuse collectors throwing away garbage into a skip in Da Peng, in 2001. China, which eclipsed the United States as the world's largest waste maker in 2004, generates 70 percent of the trash in the East Asia-Pacific region.

"This report should be seen as a giant wake-up call to policy makers everywhere," he said.

China, which eclipsed the United States as the world's largest waste maker in 2004, generates 70 percent of the trash in the East Asia-Pacific region.

China, other parts of , and parts of and the Middle East have the fastest-growing production of .

The World Bank called for better waste management and recycling to combat greenhouse gas emissions, saying the old concept of "throwing away" trash no longer works.

"In solid waste management there is no 'away,'" the authors said.

"When 'throwing away' waste, system complexities and the integrated nature of materials and pollution are quickly apparent."

A group of scavengers dig through trash at the Jardim Gramacho landfill, the biggest in South America, in Rio de Janeiro, in May. In a report on "a relatively silent problem that is growing daily," released on Wednesday, the World Bank estimated city dwellers will generate a waste pile of 2.2 billion tonnes a year by 2025, up 70 percent from today's level of 1.3 billion tonnes.

The report's authors recommended a waste management plan that includes input from all of a city's stakeholders, including citizen groups and the poor and disadvantaged.

The report also pointed to recycling and other measures to reduce that come from inefficient solid waste management practices.

"Improving solid waste management, especially in the rapidly growing cities of low-income countries, is becoming a more and more urgent issue," said Rachel Kyte, vice president, Sustainable Development at the .

"The findings of this report are sobering," she said.

"But they also offer hope that once the extent of this issue is recognized, local and national leaders, as well as the international community, will mobilize to put in place programs to reduce, reuse, recycle, or recover as much waste as possible before burning it -- and recovering the energy -- or otherwise disposing of it."

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User comments : 4

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dogbert
3 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2012
The practice of burying waste in massive land fills is tremendously wasteful and costly. Recycling and burning make much more sense, but since the AGW crowd won't let anyone burn anything ...
Bradley_Robinson
not rated yet Jun 07, 2012
The World Bank thinks waste is a problem, and the Numbers clearly indicate scale. This is of significant interest to me, as I have invested considerable time, and effort to demononstrate my abillitys to convert this so called waste into new built environments of very high quality.. Cost Competitivly.. and make my living doing so in the competitive feild of residential construction. The truth is this story is much more fascinating than most people are aware. Anyone interested... this is a very simple...and complex, but unique multi level effort in researh and practical experiment. google Monolith Biocrete Biobloc
SatanLover
0.8 / 5 (25) Jun 07, 2012
The biggest waste on this Earth are bankers (whom have not join my evil army yet).
irjsiq
4 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2012
A company 'Star-Tech' claimed the burning of trash, in a Plasma, reduce the 'trash' to a grey ash of atoms!
Have read nothing about the company recently.
If such 'Ash' is indeed individual 'Atoms', these atoms could be literally, mined, resulting is zero waste; and total recycling of Elements!
Throwing anything away is no longer adequate! There is no place for trashing valuable resources!

Roy J Stewart,
Phoenix AZ