Ultralow power high quality EEG system for ambulatory monitoring

Jun 15, 2012
Bare dies of the backend and active electrodes of imec’s EEG asic

Today at the VLSI circuits symposium (June 12-15, Honolulu), Imec presents a complete 700µW 8-channel active-electrode (AE)-based EEG monitoring system. The system, developed in collaboration with Panasonic, delivers high quality EEG signals and facilitates ambulatory use and patient comfort.

The complete low-power 8-channel system consists of a set of AEs and a back-end (BE) analog signal processor. It is capable of continuously, while concurrent recording 8 channel EEG signals and electrode-tissue contact impedance (ETI) of the biopotential electrodes. This simultaneous recording enables remote assessment of electrode status during EEG recording. The EEG channels of the system consume less than 87µW (including ETI). The AEs have a gain that relaxes the noise specifications of the BE and a high input impedance (1.2GΩ at 10Hz) that enables recording from dry electrode. A complete EEG channel, consisting of two AEs and the BE, has high common-mode CMRR (>84dB), and a low noise (1.75µVrms, 0.5-100Hz). These characteristics are essential to extract high quality EEG-signals: µV-range low-frequency signals under a large amount of common-mode (CM) interference.

Imec’s EEG acquisition system does not require the use of commercial active components (e.g., bulky instrumentation amplifiers, ADCs etc) in the signal path and delivers a complete solution for digital interfacing. The system is suitable for ambulatory EEG monitoring. Compared to current EEG monitoring systems, ambulatory monitoring increases the patient’s autonomy and comfort. The system is also applicable for sports devices, entertainment, comfort monitoring, and other health and lifestyle products and services.

The industry can access this technology by joining imec’s Human++ program as research partner or by licensing agreements for further product development. Within the Human++ program, and Holst Centre develop solutions for an efficient and better healthcare. Intelligent body area networks with wireless sensors, such as this EEG system, allow ambulatory monitoring of people, which increases the comfort level of patients and is a cost- and time-efficient alternative for current EEG monitoring systems, as well as home results in daily life measurements that cannot be taken in a clinical environment.

Explore further: Japan court orders Facebook to reveal revenge porn IP addresses

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Wireless EEG system self-powered by body heat and light

Apr 09, 2008

In the framework of Holst Centre, IMEC has developed a battery-free wireless 2-channel EEG (electroencephalography or monitoring of brain waves) system powered by a hybrid power supply using body heat and ...

Wireless sensor systems enable a better sleep

Sep 02, 2009

Today, at IEEE EMB Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota (USA), IMEC and its research affiliate Holst Centre present the clinical validation of a wireless sleep staging system.

Towards zero training for brain-computer interfacing

Aug 13, 2008

While invasive electrode recordings in humans show long-term promise, non-invasive techniques can also provide effective brain-computer interfacing (BCI) and localization of motor activity in the brain for paralyzed patients ...

Monitoring your health with your mobile phone

Oct 05, 2010

Belgian Imec, together with TASS software professionals have developed a mobile heart monitoring system that allows to view your electrocardiogram on an Android mobile phone.

Recommended for you

Samsung phones cleared for US government use

46 minutes ago

Samsung Electronics Co. said Tuesday some of its Galaxy mobile devices were approved by the National Security Agency for use with classified U.S. government networks and data, a boost to the company's efforts to expand in ...

Amazon, Simon & Schuster sign book retail deal

2 hours ago

Amazon has reached a deal with American book publisher Simon & Schuster, the companies said, though the e-commerce giant remains at loggerheads with France's Hachette over e-book pricing.

Review: Apple Pay in action

2 hours ago

If there ever comes a day I can ditch my wallet and use my phone to pay for everything, I'll look back to my first purchase through Apple Pay: a Big Mac and medium fries for $5.44. That wallet-free day won't ...

User comments : 0