Terra satellite spots newborn Tropical Depression Doksuri in W. Pacific

Jun 26, 2012
This infrared image from the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite was captured on June 26 at 0228 UTC. The higher thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Depression Doksuri are casting shadows on the lower, less potent storms surrounding them. Credit: Credit: NASA/NRL

Another tropical depression was born in the western North Pacific, and NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn cyclone. Tropical depression Doksuri, known in the Philippines as Dindo, was born during the early hours of June 26, 2012 in the western North Pacific Ocean.

The Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite as captured an infrared image of the newborn storm on June 26 at 0228 UTC. The image revealed higher thunderstorms around the center of Tropical Depression Doksuri that were casting shadows on the lower, less potent storms surrounding them. The bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the center of the circulation appear fragmented on . also shows that the southwestern quadrant has a large area of strong convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms that make up the tropical cyclone) and thunderstorms.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m .EDT) it was located 545 nautical miles (627 miles/1,009 km) east of Manila, Philippines, near 14.6 North and 130.3 West. It was moving to the west at 10 knots (11.5/18.5 kph)and had near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It is expected to intensify as it is in an area of warm , and wind shear is expected to relax. Doksuri is forecast to pass north of Lumon Island, then skirt the coast of China.

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