Teenagers not taken in by raunchy imagery

Jun 08, 2012
Credit: iStockphoto/©Barbara Reddoch

(Phys.org) -- School-age teenagers are widely exposed to sexualised and raunchy imagery, but are developing their own ways of dealing with it, a Flinders University sociology researcher has found.

As part of her recently completed PhD, Ms Monique Mulholland undertook a study involving children aged 13 to 16 from three Adelaide high schools.

The study used a series of whole-class activities designed to elicit the response of to sexualized images popularly available in , advertising, music video clips, and internet . (No pornographic imagery was viewed as part of the study.)

While the study confirmed that are finding sexual images readily accessible, Ms. Mulholland said they did not seem to be “taking over their hearts and minds”.

She said, however, that strong concerns must remain about the long-term effects of such exposure.

Thanks to the Internet and social media, “sexual images are definitely out from under the bed”, Ms. Mulholland said, but she also found that one of the dominant ideas of the public debate – that sexualized imagery had become “normal” and was causing a loss of moral sense with regards to sexuality – was not borne out by the teenagers’ responses.

“They weren’t saying that anything goes. They haven’t normalised it: rather, they are keeping it at a distance, often by using humour,” she said.

“The young people are saying that they’re laughing at it, and it seems that they still have very conventional ideas of what’s good and bad.”

One of the teenagers drew a parallel between sexualised imagery and video games, and said that young people are well aware of the difference between fantasy and real life.

“They are saying they have some agency in this, that they are quite savvy about it,” Ms. Mulholland said.

But because her study was conducted in broad, collective terms on widely available sexualized images, Ms. Mulholland said it could not assess the long-term and individual effects of ‘raunch culture’ on the actual sexual practices of , which, she said, remain an issue of major concern.

“While young people are not blindly mimicking what they see, it has to affect them somehow, and the ease of access is still deeply concerning,” she said.

Ms. Mulholland believes that more research is needed to help in formulating policy about a practical response.

She said that parents, authorities and schools need to deal rationally with the existence of the phenomenon, since the effect of ‘protective panics’ is that children are denied proper practical support and advice in dealing with what they may see.

Explore further: Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

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User comments : 7

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Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (2) Jun 08, 2012
Damn!
Lex Talonis
4 / 5 (4) Jun 08, 2012
(No pornographic imagery was viewed as part of the study.)

Oh Fuck No! - Oh no we can't have anyone seeing pictures of people fucking!

"Oh OH OH everyone is FUCKING, MASTURBATING, and images and videos of people doing sex is EVERYWHERE..... It's ALL over the fucking INTERNET..

"But we can't let them see it - we have to be REALLY sure that this does not happen and that we really must emphasis this point, that NON of the people in the study were EXPOSED to images of people FUCKING".

Fucking idiots.

SatanLover
1 / 5 (25) Jun 08, 2012
Wait, why is sex bad? I thought god masturbated while virgin maria was washing herself his sperm shot out at the speed of a million suns into virgin marias vagina.

God stole my fucking girlfriend, so now i am stuck masturbating over the skies in alaska spraying my phyoplankton sperm over the earth.

Also here are a few tips:

Masturbate every day to keep the STDs away.
Masturbate every day to keep the babies away.
Masturbating gives you endorphins.
Masturbating prevents reproductive organ cancer.

Porn is good!
Sean_W
3 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2012
"She said, however, that strong concerns must remain about the long-term effects of such exposure.
"


Even though there is no good evidence to support these concerns?
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Jun 09, 2012
When I was growing up as an ape in Borneo I saw my neighbor apes and my parents going at it all the time. As a result I became a serial killer.

Oh wait.... I became a serial killer after playing too many violent video games...

Oh wait.... I became a serial killer after watching too many violent movies.

Oh wait.... I became a serial killer after listening to too much modern music.

Oh wait.... I became a serial killer after looking at too much modern art.

Oh wait.... I became a serial killer after looking at nudes painted in classic artworks.

Oh wait.... I haven't actually killed anyone yet.

But the day is young.
rubberman
not rated yet Jun 14, 2012
I wish I had found this article earlier....5's for all of you!
Keep feeding the aquatic food chain Satanlover
Deathclock
1 / 5 (1) Jun 14, 2012
Sex is horrible but wonton violence is a-okay, right America?

(P.S. I'm an American)

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