Space shuttle 'grazes' wing in final river voyage

Jun 05, 2012
Space Shuttle Enterprise is carried by barge underneath the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City on June 3. The shuttle clipped a wing while passing under another bridge.

The final frontier may be tough, but, as a damaged wingtip proves, the space shuttle Enterprise's final journey by barge through New York is no picnic.

The Enterprise suffered minor damage to a wingtip when it collided with a piling near a bridge while being transported to a museum on the former Intrepid in .

The accident happened on Sunday and damaged a protective layer of foam on the craft's wingtip, the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum said.

"While approaching the Railroad Bridge, a sudden microburst of wind, measured at 35 knots, caused the rub panel foam protective layer of the wingtip of the Enterprise to graze the protective wood piling bumpers in the water designed to bumper vessels," the museum said in a statement.

"There was no damage to the and light cosmetic damage to the protective layer."

Squally weather has complicated the schedule of the river trip, which began at John F. Kennedy Airport and was meant to end with the Enterprise being craned up onto Intrepid on Tuesday.

That operation is now scheduled to take place on Wednesday.

A prototype, Enterprise was completed in 1976, then used for atmospheric test flights the following year. It never flew in , unlike the other five members of the fleet.

Explore further: Chilly end for sex geckos sent into space by Russia

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GSwift7
4.2 / 5 (5) Jun 05, 2012
Oh, that's gotta suck. Imagine being the barge pilot. You know he saw it coming before it happened and there wasn't a darn thing he could do. I'll bet he was leaning sideways like a guy trying to get a bowling ball to steer away from the gutter. lol. Butt cheeks tightened up, fingers gripping the controls and a couple of four letter words.
Lex Talonis
1 / 5 (1) Jun 05, 2012
Oh stiff shit.

The last thing that went through a grass hoppers mind when it hit my windscreen today, was it's arsehole.
axemaster
1 / 5 (2) Jun 05, 2012
While approaching the Railroad Bridge, a sudden microburst of wind, measured at 35 knots, caused the...

Microburst? There's no way that's a real technical term... right? Sometimes the words people choose to use just make me wonder how retarded the world actually must be...
arrgh_
5 / 5 (2) Jun 05, 2012
No, of course it isn't, axemaster. Except, it is..... maybe Google stuff before you spout forth.....
Picard
not rated yet Jun 06, 2012
While approaching the Railroad Bridge, a sudden microburst of wind, measured at 35 knots, caused the...

Microburst? There's no way that's a real technical term... right? Sometimes the words people choose to use just make me wonder how retarded the world actually must be...

Why is everything always retarded to people when anything is not 100% as they would like it. The overdramatic and emotive use of that word in almost all cases is just plainly misplaced.
English-Scientific
not rated yet Jun 06, 2012
While approaching the Railroad Bridge, a sudden microburst of wind, measured at 35 knots, caused the...

Microburst? There's no way that's a real technical term... right? Sometimes the words people choose to use just make me wonder how retarded the world actually must be...

Why is everything always retarded to people when anything is not 100% as they would like it. The overdramatic and emotive use of that word in almost all cases is just plainly misplaced.


Captain Picard was never that conceited was he?