Space Image: The Veil Nebula

Jun 13, 2012
The Veil Nebula, left behind by the explosion of a massive star thousands of years ago, is one of the largest and most spectacular supernova remnants in the sky. The image was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in November 1994 and August 1997. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration; Acknowledgment: J. Hester (Arizona State University)

The Veil Nebula, left behind by the explosion of a massive star thousands of years ago, is one of the largest and most spectacular supernova remnants in the sky.

The image was taken with Hubble's 2 in November 1994 and August 1997.

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