Robot learns language through 'conversation' with people

June 13, 2012

A robot analogous to a child between 6 and 14 months old can develop rudimentary linguistic skills through interaction with a human participant, as reported June 13 in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

By engaging in a few minutes of "conversation" with humans, in which the participants were instructed to speak to the robot as if it were a small child, the robot moved from random syllabic babble to producing some salient wordforms, the names of simple shapes and colors. The participants were not researchers involved in the project, and were asked to use their own words, rather than any prescribed lines.

The researchers, led by Caroline Lyon of the University of Hertfordshire, suggest that this work may be useful for understanding in humans. "It is known that infants are sensitive to the frequency of sounds in speech, and these experiments show how this sensitivity can be modelled and contribute to the learning of word forms by a ."

Explore further: Scientists study robot-human interactions

More information: Lyon C, Nehaniv CL, Saunders J (2012) Interactive Language Learning by Robots: The Transition from Babbling to Word Forms. PLoS ONE 7(6): e38236. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0038236

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StarGazer2011
3 / 5 (2) Jun 13, 2012
a few minutes of conversation? Sounds like the robot learned quicker than a human child.
This should be pursued for AI research, I've always thought we should mimic how nature does intelligence.
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Aug 13, 2012
Yes. Finding the mutual biochemical 'communication between neurons of the brain and the developing fetus during gestation is the key.

This will contribute to learning all parts of the human language - all 5000 'parts' of the spoken human language in a matter of one year - not a lifetime of 'learning' of only a few dozen 'parts' (languages)fluently.

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