Relocating LEDs from silicon to copper enhances efficiency

Jun 14, 2012

Chinese researchers have succeeded in transferring gallium nitride (GaN) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on a layer of silicon to a layer of copper.

The new copper substrate enabled the GaN crystals to release some of the internal stresses generated when they originally formed. This relaxation helped minimize the so-called "quantum confined stark effect," a vexing problem for LEDs that reduces their efficiency. In comparison with LEDs on silicon substrates, the light output of LEDs on copper was enhanced by 122 percent. The relocation of the LEDs produced no obvious deterioration in the crystals' light-emitting region, known as multiple .

The researchers attributed the improvements in efficiency to the removal of the absorptive substrate; the insertion of a metal reflector between the LEDs' structure and the copper submount; the elimination of electrode shading, which also reduces efficiency; and the rough surface of the exposed buffer layer, which improves crystal orientation on the substrate. The results are reported in a paper accepted for publication in the American Institute of Physics' journal .

Explore further: Finding faster-than-light particles by weighing them

More information: "Crack-free InGaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes structures transferred from Si (111) substrate onto electroplating copper submount with embedded electrodes" Applied Physics Letters.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Conquering LED efficiency droop

Apr 30, 2012

WASHINGTON, April 30--Like a coffee enthusiast who struggles to get a buzz from that third cup of morning joe, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) seem to reach a point where more electricity no longer imparts the ...

Nanowires offer opportunities for improved LEDs

Jul 01, 2011

Researchers from Dutch FOM Institute AMOLF, together with colleagues from Philips Research, Eindhoven University of Technology and Delft University of Technology, have made special nanostructures that could ...

Soraa LED light may dim 50-watt halogen rivals

Feb 09, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Soraa, a Fremont, California company founded in 2008, this week launched its first product, a light that uses LEDS (light emitting diodes). The "Soraa LED MR16 lamp" is the "perfect" replacement ...

LEDs on silicon can reduce production costs

May 21, 2012

A new manufacturing technology is expected to greatly reduce the cost of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the future. For the first time ever, researchers at the Siemens subsidiary Osram Opto Semiconductors ...

Recommended for you

Finding faster-than-light particles by weighing them

Dec 26, 2014

In a new paper accepted by the journal Astroparticle Physics, Robert Ehrlich, a recently retired physicist from George Mason University, claims that the neutrino is very likely a tachyon or faster-than-light par ...

Controlling core switching in Pac-man disks

Dec 24, 2014

Magnetic vortices in thin films can encode information in the perpendicular magnetization pointing up or down relative to the vortex core. These binary states could be useful for non-volatile data storage ...

Atoms queue up for quantum computer networks

Dec 24, 2014

In order to develop future quantum computer networks, it is necessary to hold a known number of atoms and read them without them disappearing. To do this, researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have developed ...

New video supports radiation dosimetry audits

Dec 23, 2014

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), working with the National Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance Group, has produced a video guideĀ to support physicists participating in radiation dosimetry audits.

Acoustic tweezers manipulate cell-to-cell contact

Dec 22, 2014

Sound waves can precisely position groups of cells for study without the danger of changing or damaging the cells, according to a team of Penn State researchers who are using surface acoustic waves to manipulate ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.