NASA follows Tropical Storm Talim's heavy rainfall over Taiwan

Jun 21, 2012
This TRMM 3-D image uses data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar instrument to show the heights of powerful storms near Talim's center in the Strait Of Taiwan. Some powerful storms are shown reaching heights of about 16km (~9.9 miles). Rainfall rates for the red areas are around 2 inches/50mm per hour. Credit: Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce

Tropical storm Talim has produced torrential rainfall over southern Taiwan as it pumped warm moist air from the South China Sea over mountainous terrain. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called TRMM flew over tropical storm Talim in the Taiwan Strait on June 20, 2012 at 0140 UTC and captured its heavy rainfall.

TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data from this orbit shows that tropical storm Talim was dropping rainfall at a rate of almost 50mm/hr (2 inches/hr)over Taiwan. captured with that orbit showed that the most intense rainfall of over 50mm/hr (~2 inches) was located over the Strait of Taiwan.

Flash flooding and landslides are probable in southern Taiwan due to heavy rainfall contributed by tropical storm Talim. That area of Taiwan has received almost 600 mm (~23.6 inches) of rainfall over the past week. Maps of potential landslide areas resulting from heavy rainfall are routinely produced and shown on the TRMM web site at trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov.

The 3-D image created using data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument showed the heights of powerful storms near Talim's center were reaching heights of about 16km (~9.9 miles).

On June 20 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/U.S.) Talim was located near 24.5 North and 120.1 East, about 85 miles west-southwest of Taipei, Taiwan. Talim is moving east-northeast near 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kph), and has near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph).

After Talim departs the Strait of Taiwan, its next stop is Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan, located on Kyushu Island, where more heavy rain is expected.

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