NASA tracks tiny Tropical Storm Guchol in western North Pacific

Jun 12, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Guchol on June 12 at 0335 UTC and captured a near-infrared image of the storm from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument. The infrared imagery indicates that convection and thunderstorms are consolidating over the low-level circulation center. Two tightly curved bands of thunderstorms are wrapping into the low-level center from the northeastern and southwestern quadrants of the storm. Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

Tropical Storm Guchol appears as a small tropical storm on NASA satellite imagery as it tracks through the western North Pacific Ocean today, June 12, 2012.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Guchol on June 12 at 0335 UTC and captured a near-infrared image of the storm from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. The indicates that convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms) and thunderstorms are consolidating over the low-level circulation center. Two tightly curved bands of thunderstorms are wrapping into the low-level center from the northeastern and southwestern quadrants of the storm. indicates that dry air along the northern edge of the storm is preventing thunderstorm formation, which accounts for the slow development of the storm, and the smaller size.

On June 12 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/U.S.), Guchol, formerly known as Tropical Depression 05W, has near 65 knots (~75 mph/120.4 kph). It is located about 225 nautical miles east of Yap, near 9.7 North and 141.7 East. It is moving to the west at 7 knots (8 mph/13 kph). A tropical storm warning is in effect for Fais and Ulithi in Yap State, Micronesia.

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