Malware hunter Kaspersky warns of cyber war dangers

Jun 06, 2012 by Steve Weizman
The Russian malware hunter whose firm discovered the Flame virus said there could be plenty more malicious code out there, and warned he feared a disastrous cyber attack could be coming.

The Russian malware hunter whose firm discovered the Flame virus said Wednesday there could be plenty more malicious code out there, and warned he feared a disastrous cyber attack could be coming.

"It's quite logical that there are new cyber weapons designed, and maybe already computers infected that we don't know about," Eugene Kaspersky, founder of , said on the fringes of a Tel Aviv University conference.

Kaspersky Lab, one of the world's biggest producers of anti-virus software, said its experts discovered Flame during an investigation prompted by the .

Iran appears to have been the main target of the attack which was discovered just a month after the Islamic republic said it halted the spread of a data-deleting virus targeting in its oil sector.

The Moscow-based firm said the virus was "about 20 times larger than Stuxnet," the worm which was discovered in June 2010 and used against Iran's , with Israel widely suspected of involvement.

Observers have speculated Israel may also have been involved in Flame, but Kaspersky declined to speculate, saying its development was not necessarily limited to the most technologically advanced countries.

"Flame is extremely complicated but I think that many countries can do the same or similar -- even the countries which don't have expertise at the moment," he said.

But other analysts have described the virus as "clumsy," saying it was unsophisticated and did not resemble the work of a country with highly advanced technological capacities.

Kaspersky put the development costs of Flame at "less than $100 million" (80 million euros) but said the potential damage caused by such programmes was likely to be enormous.

"Cyber weapons can replicate, and there could be random victims anywhere around the globe, it doesn't matter how far you are from the conflict," he said.

"It's not cyberwar, it's and I'm afraid it's just the beginning of the game."

He recalled Stuxnet and a 1970 denial of service -- or DOS -- attack that paralysed Estonia's information technology systems, and said the next wave could be far more devastating.

"I'm afraid that it will be the end of the world as we know it," he said. "I'm afraid that very soon the world will be very different."

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TS1
5 / 5 (1) Jun 06, 2012
A "1970 denial of service -- or DOS -- attack that paralysed Estonia's information technology systems".

Wow I did not know Estonia's computers were network connected to a sufficient degree in 1970. Nowadays many DOS attacks rely on the TCP protocol that has its origin in a 1974 paper. So perhaps he meant "1970's" (the decade) and not 1970 (the year). Or otherwise that attack was on some other protocol.

I am interested in computing history so if anyone knows what kind of attack that could have been, any details are appreciated.
gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Jun 06, 2012
1970 Estonia didn't have computers nor networks. A major cyber attack from Russia occurred in 2007.
kaasinees
3 / 5 (2) Jun 06, 2012
Lol get Linux you douchebags.
wiyosaya
1 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2012
Yet another advertisement from Kapersky designed to scare everyone into buying their "defense" software. Since when did Phys.Org start running free commercials for companies?

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