Guchol is a tiny typhoon on NASA satellite imagery

Jun 14, 2012
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Guchol on June 13 at 1635 UTC (12:35 p.m. EDT) and captured an infrared view of the storm's clouds and temperatures. The AIRS instrument on Aqua captured infrared and temperature data on Guchol. The lowest temperatures were as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius) and appear in purple. Credit: Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen

Tropical Storm Guchol intensified into a typhoon and is a compact system. It appears as a strong, small typhoon in infrared NASA satellite imagery today.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Guchol on June 13 and 14 and captured an of the storm's clouds and temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared and on Guchol. When cloud temperatures get colder, it means that clouds are getting higher. The lowest temperatures were as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). The imagery also showed a small, compact system with a central dense overcast, about 120 miles (~193 km) in diameter. also showed tightly-curved bands of thunderstorms wrapping into a well-defined low-level circulation center.

As Guchol is expected to impact the east central and northeastern Luzon over the next couple of days, in the Philippines are calling Guchol "Butchoy."

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/U.S. or 11 p.m. Asia/Manila time, Philippines), Guchol had near 70 knots (~80 mph/~130 kph). Tropical storm-force winds extend out about 60 miles (96.5 km) from the center (making the storm about 120 miles (193.1 km) in diameter), while typhoon-force winds extend only 20 nautical miles (23 miles/37 km) from the center.

It was located about 750 nautical miles (863.1 miles/1389 km) east-southeast of Manila, Philippines near 10.8 North and 132.7 East, so it was quite a distance from land. It was moving to the west near 12 knots (~14 mph/~22 kph). Typhoon Guchol is still on track to brush east central and northern Luzon, Philippines beginning June 15 as it moves north-northeast and toward southern Japan. Interests in the Philippines and Okinawa, Japan should monitor the progress of this storm.

Explore further: Better forecasts for sea ice under climate change

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Better forecasts for sea ice under climate change

6 hours ago

University of Adelaide-led research will help pinpoint the impact of waves on sea ice, which is vulnerable to climate change, particularly in the Arctic where it is rapidly retreating.

"Ferrari of space' yields best map of ocean currents

14 hours ago

A satellite dubbed the "Ferrari of space" has yielded the most accurate model of ocean circulation yet, boosting understanding of the seas and a key impact of global warming, scientists said Tuesday.

Researcher studies deformation of tectonic plates

17 hours ago

Sean Bemis put his hands together side by side to demonstrate two plates of the earth's crust with a smooth boundary running between them. But that boundary is not always smooth and those plates do not always ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.