Global research centre on ocean acid launched

Jun 18, 2012

The UN nuclear agency announced on Monday the creation of a new centre in Monaco to help coordinate international efforts to research and combat the serious environmental problem of ocean acidification.

"During the past five years, numerous multinational and national research projects on ocean acidification have emerged and significant research advances have been made," the said,

"The time is now ripe to provide international coordination to gain the greatest value from national efforts and research investments," said Daud bin Mohamad, IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Sciences and Applications.

The growing amounts of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere through human activity are being absorbed in the planet's oceans, increasing their acidity.

According to experts, may render most regions of the ocean inhospitable to coral reefs by 2050 if levels continue to increase, the IAEA said.

This could lead to substantial changes in commercial fish stocks, threatening food security for millions of people as well as the multi-billion-dollar fishing industry, it added.

The new centre, due to be opened this summer, will be overseen by national and international bodies including the UN Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and leading scientists and economists in the field.

Explore further: Earthworms as nature's free fertilizer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Increased acidity not an even test for coral reefs

Nov 10, 2011

Coral reefs can both positively and negatively influence the acidity of their surrounding seawater. That is the take-home message of two papers recently published in the international journal Global Change Bi ...

Ecosystems under threat from ocean acidification

Mar 29, 2010

Acidification of the oceans as a result of increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide could have significant effects on marine ecosystems, according to Michael Maguire presenting at the Society for General Microbiology's ...

EPA tells states to consider rising ocean acidity

Nov 17, 2010

(AP) -- States with coastal water that is becoming more acidic because of carbon dioxide should list them as impaired under the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Agency said.

Recommended for you

Earthworms as nature's free fertilizer

36 minutes ago

Earthworm presence in the soil increases crop yield, shows a new study that was published this week in Scientific Reports. "This is not unexpected," says Jan Willem van Groenigen, associate professor in the ...

A success in managed pressure drilling

46 minutes ago

As one of BP's top 40 wells globally (and the only UK well qualifying for that category in 2012), the successful delivery of the Harding field's 'Producer North East 2a' well (referred to as PNE2a) was crucial to the business. ...

Passion for the natural world clears the waters

53 minutes ago

A toxic legacy has hung over the picturesque northern NSW coastal hamlet of Urunga for almost 40 years. Although now obscured by dense vegetation, the forest of dead melaleuca trees at the edge of a wetland ...

Indonesia to ratify ASEAN haze agreement

5 hours ago

Indonesia's parliament on Tuesday voted to ratify a regional agreement on cross-border haze as fires ripped through forests in the west of the country, choking neighbouring Singapore with hazardous smog.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Howhot
not rated yet Jun 20, 2012
Yeah! Its about time that this subject gets some attention. The impact of ocean acidification is already becoming apparent with coral bleaching for example. We also know that ocean acidification destroys the calcium shells of many types of pytoplantons and small baby mollusks.