France to ban Swiss pesticide as bee threat

Jun 01, 2012
Bees swarm in a hive in Colomiers, southwestern France. The Cruiser insecticide used in the corn fields contains an active dangerous substance for bees. France's ministry of Agriculture has decided to ban the pesticide Cruiser Swiss group Syngenta used for rape and suspected to increase bee mortality, which could lead to an effective ban within weeks.

The French government is to ban a pesticide made by Swiss giant Syngenta used in rapeseed cultivation that has been found to shorten bees' lifespan, Agriculture Minister Stephane Le Foll said Friday.

"I have warned the group that sells Cruiser that I envisage withdrawing the licence to market," Le Foll said after the National Food, Environment and Work Safety Agency (ANSES) issued a damning report on the pesticide.

The Swiss chemical giant has 15 days to respond to the ANSES report's conclusion that the pesticide shortens bees' lifespans.

"ANSES's report brings in new elements and clearly shows the harmful effect of this product on bees' mortality and I want to take into account what has been said," Le Foll said.

The minister said he would raise the possibility of a European Union-wide ban with the European Commission and the European Food Safety Agency (EFSA).

The ANSES report was called for in March after the journal Science published a French study demonstrating the harmful effects on of broad-spectrum thiamethoxam, found in Cruiser.

Explore further: PacifiCorp Energy pleads guilty in bird deaths (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

France sees labelling of contested chemical BPA

Sep 27, 2011

France's ecology minister on Tuesday said she would seek labelling requirements for food containers made with bisphenol A (BPA) after a watchdog agency sharpened its concern about this chemical.

Beekeepers call for pesticide ban

Apr 10, 2008

Environmentalists have joined Italian beekeepers in calling for a ban on the use of neonicotinoids after more than 40,000 bees died in recent months.

New study demonstrates nicotine's role in smoking behavior

Feb 27, 2007

Tobacco dependence is the leading cause of mortality in Canada. Although most smokers express a desire to stop smoking, only a small number are able to succeed. A new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health ...

Study: City bees better than rural bees

Jan 17, 2006

A French beekeepers' association says it has determined bees reared in cities are healthier and more productive than bees raised in rural areas.

Recommended for you

Study finds tropical fish moving into temperate waters

Dec 19, 2014

Tropical herbivorous fish are beginning to expand their range into temperate waters – likely as a result of climate change – and a new international study documents the dramatic impact of the intrusion ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.