US calls on EU to abandon 'lousy' carbon tax on airlines

Jun 06, 2012
US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, pictured in May 2012, on Wednesday called on the European Union to abandon its controversial carbon tax on airlines, saying the policy aimed at combatting global warming was "lousy."

US Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood on Wednesday called on the European Union to abandon its controversial carbon tax on airlines, saying the policy aimed at combatting global warming was "lousy."

"We think this is a lousy policy, a lousy law that they passed," LaHood told a on commerce and transportation.

"We strongly urge the EU to cease application" of the law "in order to help accelerate our effort to forge a global solution," he said.

The imposed on airlines by the European Union came into effect on January 1, but carriers will begin receiving bills only in 2013 after this year's have been assessed.

More than two dozen countries including China, Russia and the United States have opposed the EU move, saying it violates international law.

But the EU has said the tax will help it achieve a goal of cutting carbon emissions by 20 percent by 2020 and has insisted it will not back down on the plan.

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kaasinees
2.3 / 5 (6) Jun 06, 2012
And how does it violate international law?(because it hurts your pockets? awww sad little booboo)
Even the population are getting travel taxes.
Shelgeyr
1 / 5 (1) Jun 07, 2012
US calls on EU to abandon 'lousy' carbon tax on airlines


I would have said "lousy and pointless", but still: GOOD!

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