Compact blue dwarf can't hide from Hubble

Jun 17, 2012
Image credit: ESA/NASA

(Phys.org) -- The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this view of the dwarf galaxy UGC 5497, which looks a bit like salt sprinkled on black velvet in this image.

The object is a compact blue dwarf galaxy that is infused with newly formed clusters of stars. The bright, blue stars that arise in these clusters help to give the galaxy an overall bluish appearance that lasts for several million years until these fast-burning stars explode as supernovae.

UGC 5497 is considered part of the M 81 group of galaxies, which is located about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major (The Great Bear). UGC 5497 turned up in a ground-based telescope survey back in 2008 looking for new candidates associated with Messier 81.

According to the leading cosmological theory of , called Lambda , there should be far more satellite dwarf galaxies associated with big galaxies like the Milky Way and Messier 81 than are currently known. Finding previously overlooked objects such as this one has helped cut into the expected tally — but only by a small amount.

Astrophysicists therefore remain puzzled over the so-called "missing satellite" problem.

The field of view in this image, which is a combination of visible and infrared exposures from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, is approximately 3.4 by 3.4 arcminutes.

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User comments : 14

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Sonhouse
4.2 / 5 (5) Jun 17, 2012
Has anyone made software that could simulate the nighttime sky of a hypothetical Earth in the middle of that little galaxy?

I bet it would be crazy bright.
210
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 17, 2012
Singularly spectacular and wonderously beautiful...the marvels of the Universe, enough to satiate the tastes both subtle and gross and we only see the stuff that is active in the electromagnetic spectrum...This IS a great time to be alive...what sayest thou?

word-to-ya-muthas
yyz
5 / 5 (8) Jun 17, 2012
Just a minor clarification as to when the galaxy was "discovered".

The NASA PR seems to imply the galaxy was first noted in a 2008 study, whereas this paper, by Chibocus et al, was the first to identify this galaxy as a member of the M 81 Group, a nearby small grouping of ~40 galaxies: http://arxiv.org/...50v2.pdf

Actually, UGC 5497's listing in the "Uppsala General Catalog of Galaxies" dates to 1973 and NED and SIMBAD both list this galaxy as appearing in Vorontsov-Velyaminov's 1962 "Morphological Galaxy Catalog" where it is listed as MCG (plus)11-13-007: http://ned.ipac.c...of=table

So UGC 5497 was known to astronomers well before 2008, when its' membership in the M 81 Group was firmly established.
Lex Talonis
2.1 / 5 (7) Jun 17, 2012
A thought...

With the sci-fi stories of "stasis fields" (bubbles of imprenetrable force field)

I am thinking, with interstellar habitation and travel, how could one capture all the radiation and convert it into energy - much like an all encompassing magnifying glass, focusing the energy inwards on some kind of central core....

This would make faster than light travel possible.
dtxx
2.6 / 5 (5) Jun 18, 2012
A thought...

With the sci-fi stories of "stasis fields" (bubbles of imprenetrable force field)

I am thinking, with interstellar habitation and travel, how could one capture all the radiation and convert it into energy - much like an all encompassing magnifying glass, focusing the energy inwards on some kind of central core....

This would make faster than light travel possible.


Go die in a fire.
kevinrtrs
1.3 / 5 (12) Jun 18, 2012
here should be far more satellite dwarf galaxies associated with big galaxies like the Milky Way and Messier 81 than are currently known.

...therefore remain puzzled over the so-called "missing satellite"...

Sigh....here we go again - the actual, real-life, physical observations simply make mincemeat of the much manipulated, completely hobbled big bang theory. They will remain mystified for a long, long.... while longer.
CardacianNeverid
3.9 / 5 (7) Jun 18, 2012
Sigh....here we go again - the actual, real-life, physical observations simply make mincemeat of the much manipulated, completely hobbled big bang theory. They will remain mystified for a long, long.... while longer -KevinTard

Sigh....here we go again, a cretinist Tard parading his ignorance. It's mystifying why he continues to embarrass himself so.
kevinrtrs
1.4 / 5 (11) Jun 18, 2012
Sigh....here we go again, a cretinist Tard parading his ignorance. It's mystifying why he continues to embarrass himself so.

Your religious belief[in the big bang] forces you to ignore the physical observations. When a theory gets it so wrong in its predictions you have to wonder about it. When will you begin to remove the blinkers and face the facts? Are ad-hominem attacks all you have to offer in response to a valid remark?
CardacianNeverid
4.2 / 5 (10) Jun 18, 2012
Are ad-hominem attacks all you have to offer in response to a valid remark? -KevinTard

Yes. When it comes to the likes of you, because reasoned arguments are futile when dealing with your ilk.
kevinrtrs
2.1 / 5 (11) Jun 18, 2012
Yes. When it comes to the likes of you, because reasoned arguments are futile when dealing with your ilk.

Thanks for pointing out that the pot is as black as the kettle.
SCVGoodToGo
4.4 / 5 (7) Jun 18, 2012
Yes. When it comes to the likes of you, because reasoned arguments are futile when dealing with your ilk.

Thanks for pointing out that the pot is as black as the kettle.


So is this an admission of hypocrisy Kev? Are you admitting that you're trolling?
TkClick
3.7 / 5 (6) Jun 18, 2012
Missing dwarf galaxies are really problem of Big Bang theory and it belongs into official list of unsolved physical problems. Whereas the steady state universe model would require the gradual evaporation of old galaxies together with their central black holes - or we would have the universe full of black holes and dwarf galaxies already. In this way, just the ancient galaxies like the Milky Way are surrounded with lower amount of galaxies, then it corresponds their size and age, because these galaxies are already evaporated. Of course there exists an alternative proposal of mainstream cosmology, that the "missing galaxies" are still there - they're just invisible.
alfie_null
5 / 5 (1) Jun 18, 2012
Sigh....here we go again, a cretinist Tard parading his ignorance. It's mystifying why he continues to embarrass himself so.

Note, though, that he's been shamed into putting his light under a bushel (as it were). Doesn't promote his views any more, just attacks others.
elektron
not rated yet Jun 18, 2012
It's very pretty, but I'm hanging out for a supernova visible in the daytime sky. It's been long enough surely. Maybe it's even on the way as I write.

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