Climate change to cost LatAm $100 bn by 2050: study

June 6, 2012
A couple stroll along a track at La Tigra National Park, 40 km northeast of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, on June 3. Global warming could exact a devastating toll on the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean, with costs possibly exceeding $100 billion by 2050, the Inter-American Development Bank warned Tuesday.

Global warming could exact a devastating toll on the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean, with costs possibly exceeding $100 billion by 2050, the Inter-American Development Bank warned Tuesday.

In a new report, the Washington-based organization also called for "forceful" reductions in to forestall some of the worst consequences of .

The bank urged countries in the region to dramatically increase their efforts to prevent climate change and mitigate its negative impacts, including drought, diminishing , vanishing glaciers and raging floods.

"Many climate-related changes are irreversible and will continue to impact the region over the long term," Walter Vergara, the bank's Division Chief of Climate Change and Sustainability and the lead researcher of the study, said in a statement.

"To prevent further damages, adaptation is necessary but not enough. Bolder actions are needed to bend the emissions curve in the coming decades," he said.

The report -- issued by the bank, the Economic Commission of Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the (WWF) -- is to be formally unveiled later this month at the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

The gathering in Rio de Janeiro of more than 100 heads of state and tens of thousands of participants from governments, the private sector and NGOs will mark the 20th anniversary of the 1992 "Earth Summit" in the Brazilian city.

Explore further: UN panel: New taxes needed for a climate fund

Related Stories

UN panel: New taxes needed for a climate fund

August 5, 2010

(AP) -- British economist Nicholas Stern says a U.N. economic panel is discussing carbon taxes, add-ons to international air fares and a levy on cross-border money transfers as ways to raise $100 billion a year to fight ...

Mayors reach climate deal with World Bank

June 1, 2011

Leaders of the C40 Mayors Summit on climate change said Wednesday the group had reached a financing agreement with the World Bank to help the world's major cities better adapt to climate change.

Central America launches its 'Google' of weather

July 22, 2011

Officials launched a database Thursday they dubbed the "Google of Central American weather," designed to predict natural disasters as the region grapples with devastating consequences blamed on climate change.

Energy, food security to dominate Rio+20: envoy

October 13, 2011

Boosting energy efficiency and renewables and providing food for a future world of eight billion will dominate next year's UN Rio+20 conference, the talks' co-coordinator said on Thursday.

Climate change to bring more floods: World Bank

November 10, 2011

Climate change will bring more floods and extreme weather to Southeast Asia, a World Bank official said Thursday on a visit to the region, where hundreds have died in severe inundation.

Recommended for you

Playing 'tag' with pollution lets scientists see who's 'it'

July 29, 2015

Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot from different global regions and can track where it lands on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers have determined which areas around the plateau contribute the most soot—and ...

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

July 28, 2015

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

NotParker
1 / 5 (2) Jun 06, 2012
"Many climate-related changes are irreversible"

The ice ages disagree with such stupidity.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.