NLT announces naked-eye display with better 3-D view

May 18, 2012 by Nancy Owano report
NLT announces naked-eye display with better 3-D view

(Phys.org) -- NLT Technologies has announced its development of an autostereoscopic multiview display based on the success of its HxDP technology. HxDP stands for Horizontally x times Density Pixels. The company reports impressive end results as improvements in 3-D and 2-D viewing. NLT Technologies together with its sales and marketing channels in the Americas and Europe, Renesas Electronics America and Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH, announced the autostereoscopic multi-view high resolution display earlier this week.

This is a low-temperature thin-film-transistor color liquid crystal display in a 2-D/3-D module prototype with wide quarter video graphics array (WQVGA) resolution. Viewers are able to see, without the aid of glasses, multi-angle images with smooth , providing a realistic 3-D view.

NLT’s HxDP technology makes it possible for 2-D and 3-D images to be displayed simultaneously in the same resolution on the same screen without the need for 3-D glasses. In addition, it is possible to choose the number of viewpoints for a 3-D image and display a 3-D image with the given number of viewpoints anywhere on the screen.

Image: NLT

NLT’s HxDP technology is reported as a step up from its HDDP (Horizontally Double-Density Pixels) technology. The autostereoscopic displays can support multiple views, which provides a more natural 3-D viewing experience, notes NLT. One hurdle in particular that NLT says it addressed has to do with 3-D cross talk, which is said to be a common issue with 3-D displays. Cross-talk happens when the human visual system mixes left-eye and right-eye information, causing 3-D effects to be limited or decreased. NLT’s new HxDP 3D technology results in displays with reduced levels of overall 3D cross talk and a wide 3-D viewing area, all for easier viewing.

This is a six-view module composed of horizontally striped RGB color pixels, “each consisting of three sub-pixels striped horizontally and split in 1/6 lengthwise resulting in a resolution six times that of 3D LCD modules constructed with vertically striped pixels,” according to a company release from . Alternating displays of the horizontal pixels for each eye produce 3-D images.

The company envisions its products supporting industrial applications calling for stereoscopic displays such as CAD/CAM, medical, and mapping/topography, as well as for gaming.

The prototype HxDP module will be shown at The Society for Information Display's "Display Week 2012" event in Boston next month, from June 3 to June 8.

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More information: Press Release

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User comments : 4

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Eoprime
5 / 5 (5) May 18, 2012
"low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film-transistor color liquid crystal display"

LTPSTFTCLCD?
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (5) May 18, 2012
Didn't Sony just submit a patent on this technique?

It doesn't work well. They should just give it up. No amount of tweaking is going to get this dog to bark.

Russkiycremepuff
3 / 5 (6) May 18, 2012
How do you know it will not work if a patent was only recently submitted.
You are such a pessimist, Vendicar/Scott Nudds.
I would like to hear some positive feedback from you some day.
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (3) May 18, 2012
Because it is limited to one viewer, and that viewer will have to keep their head stationary for the duration of the 3d presentation included with it is an extremely high accuracy eyeball tracker.

Good luck getting your family to view your big screen tv along with you.

Oh, and since your eyes make a different angle with the screen over it's width, that will have to be compensated for as well as the sideways tilt of your head.

"How do you know it will not work if a patent was only recently submitted." - Russkie

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