Neil Armstrong gives rare interview - to accountant

May 24, 2012

The famously private Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, has been coaxed into giving a rare interview -- with an Australian accountant.

The 82-year-old has long been reluctant to discuss the 1969 mission that enthralled the world, and has granted only a handful of interviews since.

But the Certified Practicing Accountants of Australia convinced him to film an hour-long one-on-one in which he talks about the landing and his famous first steps on the moon.

"A month before the of , we decided we were confident enough we could try and attempt... a descent to the surface," said Armstrong in the video which appeared on the CPA website this week after the interview last year.

"I thought we had a 90 percent chance of getting back safely to Earth on that flight but only a 50-50 chance of making a landing on that first attempt."

CPA head Alex Malley said he suggested the idea to the space veteran when he was in Australia last year helping the organisation with its 125th anniversary, and he agreed.

"I know something not a lot of people know about -- his dad was an auditor," Malley told News Limited newspapers.

"The most compelling thing I felt about him was his -- his commitment to his team, his deference to everyone except himself, his respect for the -- I found that quite extraordinary."

Explore further: Rosetta's comet: In the shadow of the coma

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Apollo astronauts relive experiences at ceremony

Jul 18, 2009

(AP) -- It was a reunion of reunions. Twelve Apollo astronauts reminisced, traded stories and poked fun at each other Friday night as the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing and moonwalk approached.

Famous lost word: The 'a' in 'one small step' line

Jul 19, 2009

(AP) -- When Neil Armstrong first spoke from the moon, he said one thing and people on Earth heard another. What the world heard was grammatically flubbed: "That's one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind." Armstrong ...

Armstrong relives historic Moon landing

Aug 29, 2011

It's more than 40 years since Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the Moon, but his memories of the historic flight remain as undimmed as his passion for further exploration of space.

First authorized bio of Neil Armstrong

Nov 04, 2005

A former curator of aeronautics at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington has written the only authorized biography of astronaut Neil Armstrong.

Recommended for you

Rosetta's comet: In the shadow of the coma

6 hours ago

This NAVCAM mosaic comprises four individual images taken on 20 November from a distance of 30.8 km from the centre of Comet 67P/C-G. The image resolution is 2.6 m/pixel, so each original 1024 x 1024 pixel ...

DNA survives critical entry into Earth's atmosphere

Nov 26, 2014

The genetic material DNA can survive a flight through space and re-entry into the earth's atmosphere—and still pass on genetic information. A team of scientists from UZH obtained these astonishing results ...

Team develops cognitive test battery for spaceflight

Nov 26, 2014

Space is one of the most demanding and unforgiving environments. Human exploration of space requires astronauts to maintain consistently high levels of cognitive performance to ensure mission safety and success, and prevent ...

User comments : 5

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Fisty_McBeefpunch
1 / 5 (4) May 24, 2012
Well...where is it??
nuge
5 / 5 (1) May 24, 2012
> Well...where is it??

Says right there in the fourth paragraph, it's on the CPA website.
InterPur
1 / 5 (1) May 24, 2012
the website is:

thebottomline _dot_cpaaustralia_dot_com
Russkiycremepuff
1.8 / 5 (5) May 24, 2012
"The most compelling thing I felt about him was his humility -- his commitment to his team, his deference to everyone except himself, his respect for the Russians -- I found that quite extraordinary."

We Russians also have great respect for Cosmonaut Armstrong.
PhotonX
not rated yet May 25, 2012
Maybe it's selfish of me, but I've always felt that Armstrong let us down. Buzz Aldrin has been a much better representative for the space effort, he should have been the first down the ladder. Shame on Armstrong if he knew this at the time and still went first.
.
There is one question I have always wanted to ask Armstrong, though. If he could trade it, that first step, for more mission time in space, what would he choose?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.