Neil Armstrong gives rare interview - to accountant

May 24, 2012

The famously private Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, has been coaxed into giving a rare interview -- with an Australian accountant.

The 82-year-old has long been reluctant to discuss the 1969 mission that enthralled the world, and has granted only a handful of interviews since.

But the Certified Practicing Accountants of Australia convinced him to film an hour-long one-on-one in which he talks about the landing and his famous first steps on the moon.

"A month before the of , we decided we were confident enough we could try and attempt... a descent to the surface," said Armstrong in the video which appeared on the CPA website this week after the interview last year.

"I thought we had a 90 percent chance of getting back safely to Earth on that flight but only a 50-50 chance of making a landing on that first attempt."

CPA head Alex Malley said he suggested the idea to the space veteran when he was in Australia last year helping the organisation with its 125th anniversary, and he agreed.

"I know something not a lot of people know about -- his dad was an auditor," Malley told News Limited newspapers.

"The most compelling thing I felt about him was his -- his commitment to his team, his deference to everyone except himself, his respect for the -- I found that quite extraordinary."

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User comments : 5

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Fisty_McBeefpunch
1 / 5 (4) May 24, 2012
Well...where is it??
nuge
5 / 5 (1) May 24, 2012
> Well...where is it??

Says right there in the fourth paragraph, it's on the CPA website.
InterPur
1 / 5 (1) May 24, 2012
the website is:

thebottomline _dot_cpaaustralia_dot_com
Russkiycremepuff
1.8 / 5 (5) May 24, 2012
"The most compelling thing I felt about him was his humility -- his commitment to his team, his deference to everyone except himself, his respect for the Russians -- I found that quite extraordinary."

We Russians also have great respect for Cosmonaut Armstrong.
PhotonX
not rated yet May 25, 2012
Maybe it's selfish of me, but I've always felt that Armstrong let us down. Buzz Aldrin has been a much better representative for the space effort, he should have been the first down the ladder. Shame on Armstrong if he knew this at the time and still went first.
.
There is one question I have always wanted to ask Armstrong, though. If he could trade it, that first step, for more mission time in space, what would he choose?

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