LG Display will release HD panel for smartphones

May 29, 2012 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org) -- LG Display is getting ready to showcase a five-inch smartphone display that turns out to be a full HD LCD panel supporting up to 1080p video, something like having a high-quality TV in your hand. The display will allow smartphone users to view full HD content with ideal viewing as seen on TVs and monitors and will set a high bar for other manufacturers as a result. The Seoul, Korea-based company has announced the new display with 1920x1080 resolution and impressive pixel density of 440ppi.

Smartphone displays are becoming larger in size, and the marketplace is now seeing users who view phone calls as incidental to a higher goal toward owning a handset that can do multimedia well. High resolution and pixel density have become selling points in smartphones. The new display from LG Display will draw this kind of customer.

The panel uses the 16:9 aspect ratio to make exceptional viewing of high-definition movies closest to watching HDTV. Advanced High Performance In-Plane Switching (AH-IPS) technology is behind the new Full HD LCD display, and the company claims the technology brings faster response on touchscreens, clearer colors and images, wide viewing angles, brighter light transmission, and lower power consumption,

The five-inch panel will be released in the second half of this year, but no device names were cited. Before that, LG Display, which are manufacturers of thin-film transistor liquid crystal display, will show the panel at the upcoming Society for (SID 2012) event in Boston, Massachusetts, starting June 4.

Outside the company, meanwhile, observers are extending compliments on the news of the display, with its and 16:9 widescreen aspect ratio features that suggest the display will upstage Apple’s Retina Display.

In contrast to the compliments, though, are worries being raised about the possible effects of any such high-quality display on battery life, as battery drain is often linked to large, high-density displays. Generally, vendors and carriers in the past have noted that battery technology has not caught up to rapid advances in smartphone technology. Put another way, power requirements of mobile devices are growing faster than advances in battery capacity. Batteries have seen advances but observers say these advances are not happening fast enough; significant breakthroughs are eagerly awaited. LG Display, meanwhile, says that the AH-IPS display technology for the panel provides .

Explore further: Teens love vacation selfies; adults, not so much

Related Stories

Toshiba bites Apple with 498 ppi display

Oct 24, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- As soon as Toshiba announced its 6.1-inch Liquid crystal display (LCD) panel last week, bloggers and tech news sites were noting the numbers and poking at mobile display monarchs Apple. Toshiba's ...

Apple Reduces Prices on Cinema Displays

Apr 27, 2005

Apple today announced that it has made its award-winning line of widescreen flat panel Cinema Displays more affordable than ever by reducing the price of the 20-inch model to just $799 and the 23-inch HD model to just $1,499. ...

55": LG announces world's largest OLED TV panel

Dec 27, 2011

LG Display announced that it has developed the world's largest 55-inch OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) TV panel. The 55-inch panel is a significant step forward in the popularization of OLED TVs and demonstrates ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft unveils Xbox in China as it faces probe

3 hours ago

Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled its Xbox game console in China, the first to enter the market after an official ban 14 years ago, even as it faces a Chinese government probe over business practices.

Teens love vacation selfies; adults, not so much

4 hours ago

(AP)—Jacquie Whitt's trip to the Galapagos with a group of teenagers was memorable not just for the scenery and wildlife, but also for the way the kids preserved their memories. It was, said Whitt, a "selfie ...

Tiny UAVs and hummingbirds are put to test

4 hours ago

Hummingbirds in nature exhibit expert engineering skills, the only birds capable of sustained hovering. A team from the US, British Columbia, and the Netherlands have completed tests to learn more about the ...

US spy agency patents car seat for kids

7 hours ago

Electronic eavesdropping is the National Security Agency's forte, but it seems it also has a special interest in children's car seats, Foreign Policy magazine reported Wednesday.

User comments : 12

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

javjav
not rated yet May 29, 2012
Retina displays are manufactured by Samsumg not Apple. Apple does not have any display technology, they bought it from Samsung. But this one is far superior. Not only because the extra resolution but also because at a 5 inch size you can take advantage of it, not like a dwarf iPhone. Also a 5 inch device is plenty of space for adding more battery cells.
simplicio
5 / 5 (2) May 29, 2012
But this one is far superior.

I am not sure about it. Retina display already have pixel density better than eye can see at normal watching distance. This one is much more still. It is nice technically for bragging, but will use more power for not much visual improvement on Retina. But bragging is more important, so it will sell! :-)
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (2) May 30, 2012
There is more to it than mere bragging.
Surely most of the power consumption is the backlight. So for the same 5 inch display whether low or high density pixels the backlight consumption is the same. LCD's are to a high degree static devices, its only necessary to clock through data where pixels change and the power consumption per pixel is minute as they are electrostatic field devices. The power consumption is therefore not proportional to pixel density.

I would expect it to be not much more than a 5% increase.

I notice a lot of people come closer to the display to view, the higher density will certainly aid in making fonts and curves much smoother and that isn't bragging that's a consequence of consumer driven preference and a sensible move by the company.
CardacianNeverid
5 / 5 (2) May 30, 2012
Surely most of the power consumption is the backlight. So for the same 5 inch display whether low or high density pixels the backlight consumption is the same -Mike

Not exactly. Smaller pixels (which is what the high density displays have) are less bright than larger pixels due to smaller surface area. So to compensate, you have to crank up the backlight intensity, which leads to greater power consumption.
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (3) May 30, 2012
CardacianNeverid made an ambit claim with:
..Smaller pixels (which is what the high density displays have) are less bright than larger pixels due to smaller surface area..
Is CardacianNeverid claiming the luminosity per unit area goes down and if so by what proportion ?

Take one square centimeter with larger pixels and measure the luminosity then make the pixels 30% smaller and measure it again, what difference would one expect in luminosity between the two cases ?

Its clear there are greater inter-pixel regions which do not transmit light ie Where the pixels have boundaries but these are tiny comparative to the pixel area in both cases...
CardacianNeverid
5 / 5 (2) May 30, 2012
Is CardacianNeverid claiming the luminosity per unit area goes down and if so by what proportion ? -MM

That's a specious retort. It's sufficient to be aware of the phenomenon without necessarily having the precise figures at hand.

Its clear there are greater inter-pixel regions which do not transmit light ie Where the pixels have boundaries but these are tiny -MM

The effect isn't tiny when you go to 400 dpi-plus densities, especially coming from a much lower base which is the norm today.

But the effect is real (and is compounded by the inter pixel blockage effects with backlit displays). You can take an emissive example with Plasma TVs, for example; 2 same size TVs, one HD, the other SD with same cell power displaying the same image. When viewed from a normal viewing distance, the SD picture will appear brighter. These psychovisually based tests are well known.
LuckyExplorer
not rated yet May 30, 2012
"I notice a lot of people come closer to the display to view,..."
the closest distance to watch is limited to the capabilities of our eyes.
To take advantage of that resolution one must watch the display from a distance less than 20cm (8 inches).
People older than 20-30 years are mostly not able to focus below 15-20cm.
In addition, watching very close for a longer time is inconvenient.
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (2) May 30, 2012
CardacianNeverid hand waved fact he has no data & opinion derived from mere whimsy:
That's a specious retort. It's sufficient to be aware of the phenomenon without necessarily having the precise figures at hand.
Anyone after truth appreciates contemporary quantitative methods & especially so in subjective environments.

CardacianNeverid spouted wide generalisation & claimed:
The effect isn't tiny when you go to 400 dpi-plus densities, especially coming from a much lower base which is the norm today.
Currently displays are ~1280x720 & have been for ~ a year its not 'much lower'. Inter-pixel lines for new LCDs are more precise & now improved perpendicular (& partial) reflections not lossy absorption.

CardacianNeverid offered comparison with entirely different technology
..You can take an emissive example with Plasma TVs..
No. Plasma pixels are self-luminous, LCD pixels are not !. Plasma fully *depends* on pixel size, comparatively hardly noticeable on LCD, imnsho...
CardacianNeverid
5 / 5 (1) May 30, 2012
Mike_Massen continues with sanctimonious rhetoric in lieu of any understanding of psychovisual perception principles. CardacianNeverid therefore chooses to disengage with further pointless verbiage with this individual.
javjav
not rated yet May 30, 2012
The important thing is that 5" at 1920x1080 is enough to see a web page without having to zoom & scroll like crazy. Or to read an email or any document comfortable. Or to have a much better experience watching pictures or a video. These are the main things that people use smartphones for. The battery issue is irrelevant, as the big size will permit to put as many additional cells as required.

This is serious menace for iPhone, now they will only have the "cool" and "think different" factors, which are obsolete arguments now that all your friends have it.
packrat
1 / 5 (1) Jun 03, 2012
Can't you guys just see a new add on for this? A box you put it in with a big fresnel lens in the front so you can actually make it big enough to see! 40 year old tech will work well with it!
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (2) Jun 03, 2012
Oh yeah, or you could use those spectacle clip-ons with adjustable zoom, have the screen on the table, sit back with a cup of coffee in the local shop and see the screen expanded as much as you want. I'm sure it wouldn't be difficult to add bluetooth mini headphones to the sides of the specs or put up with a stereo cable :-)

And hopefully not get bothered by curious locals - unless you want to ;-)