Image: Whitewater-Baldy complex fire

May 31, 2012
Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team, Text Credit: NASA, Rob Gutro

This image of the Whitewater-Baldy fire, in western New Mexico, was taken on Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 2000 UTC (4:00 p.m. EDT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies onboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

The red outlines indicate the heat signatures from the fires, as detected from MODIS.

The large area of light brown smoke is blowing northeast, and many areas are under smoke advisories.

The U.S. reports on Inciweb.org that the fire was active on May 29, for more than 95% of the perimeter. Crews in Mogollon and Willow Creek were providing structure protection. Those areas remain under mandatory evacuation. For more information, visit Inciweb at: www.inciweb.org/incident/2870 .

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