Hackers booby-trap foreign policy group websites

May 16, 2012
Photo illustration. Internet security researchers warned that foreign policy and human rights websites are being booby-trapped by hackers in what appears to be cyber espionage.

Internet security researchers warned that foreign policy and human rights websites are being booby-trapped by hackers in what appears to be cyber espionage.

As of Monday websites for Amnesty International Hong Kong, the Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the US Center for Defense Information (CDI) remained rigged to slip "hostile" code onto visitors' computers, according to Shadowserver Foundation devoted to tracking and reporting .

"These attackers are not spreading malware through strategically compromised websites to make friends," Shadowserver Steven Adair and Ned Moran warned in a blog post.

"They are aiming to expand their access and steal data."

Data typically sought included messages, intellectual property, research, and business intelligence such as contracts and negotiations, according to security specialists.

"The CDI website is currently serving up a malicious Flash exploit that ties back to attackers known to engage in cyber espionage," the researchers said.

"This threat group appears to be interested in targets with a tie to foreign policy and defense activities."

In recent weeks, Shadowserver has seen an array of "strategic Web compromises" taking advantage of flaws in Oracle Java and Adobe Flash programs.

The tactic is referred to as a "drive-by" attack by because people's computers are secretly infected simply by visiting a reputable website unaware that it has been booby-trapped by .

A website for the International Institute of Counter-Terrorism at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel, was listed among those compromised by hackers.

Shadowserver said that it began looking into the hacks after researchers at Websense reported last week that the main page of Amnesty International United Kingdom had been rigged with drive-by malware.

There are indications that a website for the American Research Center in Egypt was briefly compromised last week in a manner similar to the CDI page hack, according to Shadowserver.

Earlier this month the Centre for European Policy Studies at ceps.eu was similarly compromised, according to the volunteer-based Internet security group.

Shadowserver referred to the hacks as "advance persistent threats," a term used in the industry to refer to cyber espionage by groups such as governments.

"Many of these attackers are quite skilled at moving laterally within an organization and will take advantage of any entry point they have into a network," the researchers said.

"Cyber attacks are not a fabricated issue and are not going away any time soon."

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User comments : 12

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Vendicar_Decarian
3.7 / 5 (3) May 16, 2012
Undoubtedly the criminals are the Israeli and American governments.
kris2lee
not rated yet May 16, 2012
"These attackers are not spreading malware through strategically compromised websites to make friends," Shadowserver researchers Steven Adair and Ned Moran warned in a blog post.


I'm sorry but this article does not make any sense. This is just a bunch of words.
Smellyhat
not rated yet May 16, 2012
"Advanced persistent threat" is a very hyperbolic description of anyone using well-known Java & Flash exploits to install malware on the computers of visitors to poorly maintained websites.

I note that there is no mention of any evidence of any connection whatsoever to between the malware and the content of the websites.
Isaacsname
not rated yet May 16, 2012
"These attackers are not spreading malware through strategically compromised websites to make friends," Shadowserver researchers Steven Adair and Ned Moran warned in a blog post. "

..people do that to make friends ?

o,O
Terriva
1 / 5 (1) May 16, 2012
..this article does not make any sense. This is just a bunch of words
It would be way too easy to dismiss whatever idea just with claim, this idea is incomprehensible for you. It's not the problem of its author, but the problem of yours. Instead of it, you should prove first, this article violates logics at some point. Or you're at position of my dog, which is not able to understand even the simplest Pythagorean theorem for years...
Being more honest: your objection is a typical opinion of Internet troll, who actually cannot handle logics, so he uses subjective tautological "arguments". It's just the opinion of yours, which lacks the logics by now.
kris2lee
not rated yet May 16, 2012
Being more honest: your objection is a typical opinion of Internet troll, who actually cannot handle logics, so he uses subjective tautological "arguments". It's just the opinion of yours, which lacks the logics by now.


I think that you are too hasty to make such conclusions like I was about the article. More subtle wording like "your objection looks like ..." would have been more appropriate perhaps.

But anyway, it looks like I repeatedly read "now" instead of "not" and somehow it made everything that follows to disintegrate - English is not my first language.
Vendicar_Decarian
2.3 / 5 (3) May 16, 2012
Sadly this is the future of the American State.

"I'm sorry but this article does not make any sense. This is just a bunch of words." - Kris

Passing score lowered for FCAT Writing exam

http://www.clicko...dex.html

http://en.wikiped...ck_Scott
kris2lee
5 / 5 (1) May 16, 2012
Passing score lowered for FCAT Writing exam


I am sorry to disappoint you but I'm not an American. English is not even my native language and I even did not learn it in the school. So it would be impossible to blame any educational system on this.

You can check the explanation above.
Vendicar_Decarian
2.3 / 5 (3) May 16, 2012
I am not disappointed, and my response remains on target.

Americans are growing ever more illiterate and innumerate and intellectually vacant.

One need only look at the previous moron they twice elected as their president.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (6) May 16, 2012
This is expected from the government public school system. Sweep incompetence under the rug by lowering standards. Another case of failed government. It should be clear that expanded liberal government is not the way to go.
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (2) May 17, 2012
It's what you get when you elect a corrupt Republican to the state's highest office.

"This is expected from the government public school system." - NumenTard

"Sweep incompetence under the rug by lowering standards. " _ NumenTard

As the former Bush Government proved over and over again, doing so is the Republican way.

"Another case of failed government." - NumenTard

Another Failed Republican Government.

Filth.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (6) May 17, 2012
It has nothing to do with republicans, in fact they tried to tighten standards and make schools accountable, by (scientifically minded) measuring performance via testing. It's to do with gov, teachers unions, and lack of competition,... all liberal tenants.

The teachers unions are against the accountable measuring of their own performance, so any attempt to increase standards is still born given this atmosphere.

From your own link,...

School boards in Palm Beach and St. Lucie counties have passed a resolution against what they say is an over-reliance on high-stakes testing. Board members say the exams reduce time devoted to teaching and put unhealthy stress on students.


Try to tell a liberal that stress is natural and healthy and prepares one for the real world, and that testing is what scientists must do to make progress. More anti science from the mush headed unionized left.