New eyeglasses allow you to adjust prescription yourself

May 31, 2012 by Bob Yirka report

(Phys.org) -- A new kind of eyeglasses is now available from a British company that allows the wearer to adjust the prescription anytime, anywhere, via small thumb-dials on the sides. Called, Eyejusters, the glasses make use of a technology called a Slidelens, which very aptly describes how these glasses do their magic. Each lens is actually two lenses that have slightly different shapes; turning the thumb-dial causes one lens to move slightly left or right and that changes the focal point for the wearer. The lenses are moved until the person doing the focusing finds the sweet spot; which is exactly how users focus a pair of binoculars.

The web site for the Eyejusters says their main market is the , where a lot of people with can’t afford to see an eye doctor, much less the glasses that would be prescribed. Eyejusters solve both problems; when ordered, they come with an eye-chart that can be used to help discern if a person’s vision can be corrected with Eyejusters (the power range is from +4.5 to 0 D (positive) and 0 to -5.0 D (negative)) and to figure out which version they need (for near or far vision correction).

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The glasses were developed by four guys; Dave Crosby, Owen Reading, Richard Taylor and Greg Storey, who found a common interest in self-adjustable glasses and in the process created a company to fulfill the goal of providing low cost eyeglasses to the millions of people the world over who cannot afford a traditional pair. Their secondary market is for people who could use adjustable glasses for other than general use purposes, such as reading, working on a computer, knitting, i.e. for people as they get older and find they have trouble focusing while performing different tasks.

The Eyejusters, which come with detachable thumb-dials also come with a plastic case and special cleaning cloth. The cloth can be used to clean both sides of both lenses because the outer lens can be hinged down for easy access. The Eyejusters also offer UV protection, which has been incorporated to help prevent eye damage from the sun, another common problem in underdeveloped countries.

Another interesting aspect of the adjustable glasses is that it appears with a little tweaking, they could be used to perform self exams in more developed countries. By adding a digital display, the wearer could work out their own prescription and send it to a company that sells traditional , sidestepping an expensive trip to an ophthalmologist.

Explore further: Engineering students invent virtual fitting room for online shoppers (w/ video)

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dschlink
5 / 5 (2) May 31, 2012
I'm interested. I wear poly-focal lenses and any time I try looking at a close object that is above my eye level, I get nothing but blear. Looking down at the sidewalk requires tilting my head far enough so I can use the upper portion of the lens. It would be great to be able to make one adjustment for my walks, a different setting for indoors and a third one for reading or computer work. These glasses would pay for themselves by allowing me to get rid of the special pair I use for computer work.
chardo137
5 / 5 (4) May 31, 2012
We'll get these in america the same day they allow us to have blu-ray recorders. People who are far-sighted can go to the drug store and buy cheap reading glasses, but the 80% of us who need glasses and are near-sighted are still forced to go to the doctor and buy expensive eyewear. You wouldn't want to inconvenience those that already have the money and need more. They almost refuse to sell glasses made out of glass. Insurance companies telling us what we can and can't do again.

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