Can automated deep natural-language analysis unlock the power of inference?

May 08, 2012

Much of the operationally-relevant information relied on in support of DoD missions may be implicit rather than explicitly expressed, and in many cases, information is deliberately obfuscated and important activities and objects are only indirectly referenced.

Automated, deep natural-language understanding technology may hold a solution for more efficiently processing text . When processed at its most basic level without ingrained cultural filters, language offers the key to understanding connections in text that might not be readily apparent to humans. DARPA created the Deep Exploration and Filtering of Text (DEFT) program to harness the power of language. Sophisticated artificial intelligence of this nature has the potential to enable defense analysts to efficiently investigate orders of magnitude more documents so they can discover implicitly expressed, actionable information contained within them.

The development of an automated solution may rely on contributions from the linguistics and computer science fields in the areas of artificial intelligence, , machine learning, natural-language understanding, discourse and dialogue analysis, and others.

“Overwhelmed by deadlines and the sheer volume of available foreign intelligence, analysts may miss crucial links, especially when meaning is deliberately concealed or otherwise obfuscated,” said Bonnie Dorr, DARPA program manager for DEFT. “DEFT is attempting to create technology to make reliable inferences based on basic text. We want the ability to mitigate ambiguity in text by stripping away filters that can cloud meaning and by rejecting false information. To be successful, the technology needs to look beyond what is explicitly expressed in text to infer what is actually meant.”

DEFT will build on existing programs and ongoing academic research into deep language understanding and to address remaining capability gaps related to inference, causal relationships and anomaly detection.

“Much of the basic research needed for DEFT has been accomplished, but now has to be scaled, applied and integrated through the development of new technology,” Dorr said.

As information is processed, DEFT also aims to integrate individual facts into large domain models for assessment, planning and prediction. If successful, DEFT will allow analysts to move from limited, linear processing of insurmountable quantities of data to a nuanced, strategic exploration of available information.

Explore further: Forging a photo is easy, but how do you spot a fake?

More information: DARPA will hold a Proposers’ Day workshop on May 16, 2012, to answers questions regarding the DEFT program and explain the mechanics of working with DARPA. For more information, visit: go.usa.gov/VjC

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

DARPA issues BAA for advanced robotic translator

Apr 07, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has issued a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the procurement of research leading to an advanced robotic device capable of performing ...

New mathematical model to enable web searches for meaning

Sep 26, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new theory of meaning has the potential to revolutionise many artificial intelligence technologies and enable web searches that interpret the meaning of queries, according to its developer, a computer scientist ...

Computer learns language by playing games

Jul 12, 2011

Computers are great at treating words as data: Word-processing programs let you rearrange and format text however you like, and search engines can quickly find a word anywhere on the Web. But what would it ...

Recommended for you

Forging a photo is easy, but how do you spot a fake?

23 hours ago

Faking photographs is not a new phenomenon. The Cottingley Fairies seemed convincing to some in 1917, just as the images recently broadcast on Russian television, purporting to be satellite images showin ...

Algorithm, not live committee, performs author ranking

Nov 21, 2014

Thousands of authors' works enter the public domain each year, but only a small number of them end up being widely available. So how to choose the ones taking center-stage? And how well can a machine-learning ...

Professor proposes alternative to 'Turing Test'

Nov 19, 2014

(Phys.org) —A Georgia Tech professor is offering an alternative to the celebrated "Turing Test" to determine whether a machine or computer program exhibits human-level intelligence. The Turing Test - originally ...

Image descriptions from computers show gains

Nov 18, 2014

"Man in black shirt is playing guitar." "Man in blue wetsuit is surfing on wave." "Black and white dog jumps over bar." The picture captions were not written by humans but through software capable of accurately ...

Converting data into knowledge

Nov 17, 2014

When a movie-streaming service recommends a new film you might like, sometimes that recommendation becomes a new favorite; other times, the computer's suggestion really misses the mark. Yisong Yue, assistant ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.