Where the wild winds blow: Stanford engineers use weather models to site offshore wind farms

Apr 03, 2012 By Andrew Myers
The proposed nearshore locations take advantage of consistent sea breezes that occur naturally due to the daily difference in temperature between land and sea. Credit: Sergiy Serdyuk

(PhysOrg.com) -- Politics aside, most energy experts agree that cheap, clean, renewable wind energy holds great potential to help the world satisfy energy needs while reducing harmful greenhouse gases. Wind farms placed offshore could play a large role in meeting such challenges, and yet no offshore wind farms exist today in the United States.

In a study just published in Geophysical Research Letters, a team of engineers at Stanford has harnessed a sophisticated to recommend optimal placement of four interconnected off the coast of the eastern United States, a region that accounts for 34 percent of the nation's electrical demand and 35 percent of .

"It is the first time anyone has used high-resolution to plan the placement of offshore wind grid," said senior author Mark Z. Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering. "And this sophistication has provided a deeper level of understanding to the grid plan."

Beginning with 12 energetic potential locations, the engineers winnowed down the list to four optimal sites. The total potential maximum capacity of the interconnected grid is estimated at 2,000 megawatts, roughly equivalent to the yearly capacity of one-and-a-half conventional . Each farm would have approximately 100 turbines, delivering an individual maximum capacity of 500 megawatts.

"Two thousand megawatts and four farms are somewhat arbitrary figures. The sizes and locations could be adjusted for economic, environmental and policy considerations," said Jacobson.

"An offshore grid as an extension of the onshore grid in this region will improve reliability, while reducing congestion and energy between areas," said Mike Dvorak, the lead author of the study and a recent PhD graduate in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford.

Optimizing the grid

The optimized grid was located in the waters from Long Island, N.Y., to Georges Bank, a shallows about 100 miles to the east of Cape Cod. The near-shore locations of some of the farms would take advantage of consistent sea breezes that occur naturally due to the daily difference in temperature between land and sea. The offshore farms would experience stronger, though less regular, frontal storm activity. The four farms would be interconnected to help balance output across the grid.

"Until recently, large-scale wind resource assessments have neglected the aspect of time. We matched peak productivity with peak demand at specific times of day and year," said Dvorak. "Our analysis matches production to demand."

The team started with 12 randomly selected energetic locations (in magenta) between Long Island, N.Y., and a shallows about 100 miles to the east of Cape Cod, and narrowed their recommendation to four optimal locations, highlighted in red, with a total capacity of 2000 megawatts. Credit: Mike Dvorak, Stanford School of Engineering

Wind farms on land tend to see daily peak output at night, when demand is lower. Seasonally speaking, demand usually spikes in the late afternoons of summer when air conditioning needs are high, but this time of year is also known for a dearth of storms and a meteorological phenomenon known as the Bermuda High, a high-pressure center that affects winds along the entire coast.

"In some areas, like Massachusetts, the Bermuda High boosts sea breezes," said Dvorak. "But south of Long Island, N.Y., where one offshore grid has been proposed, the Bermuda High has the opposite effect and often hinders sea breezes."

Balance of power

Beyond matching production and demand cycles, the researchers had to balance several technical challenges in their models.

"The farms had to be in waters less than 50 meters deep to allow use of bottom-mounted turbines and near urban load centers like Boston and New York," said Jacobson. "And we wanted to smooth power output, ease hourly ramp rates and reduce hours of zero power."

The engineers took a novel approach, choosing to interconnect the offshore farms. in other parts of the world today are connected individually to the onshore grids.

"The goal is to even out the peaks and valleys in production," said Dvorak. "In our model, expensive no-power events – moments when individual winds farms are producing zero electricity – were reduced by more than half from 9 percent to 4 by connecting the farms together."

In the final analysis, the interconnected grid was able to yield a yearlong capacity factor of over 48 percent, meaning that the grid could reliably produce close to 1,000 on average over the course of a year.

"Generally, with wind farms, anything over 35 percent average capacity is considered excellent," said Jacobson.

Location, location, location

Among its findings, the Stanford model recommended a farm in Nantucket Sound, precisely where the controversial Cape Wind farm has been proposed. The Cape Wind site is contentious because, opponents say, the tall turbines would diminish Nantucket's considerable visual appeal.

By that same token, the meteorological model puts two sites on Georges Bank, a shallows located 100 miles offshore, far from view in an area once better known for its prodigious quantities of cod. The fourth site is off central Long Island.

The researchers last looked at the economics of installing their offshore grid, which they said would have the advantage of sharing costs across several states, potentially increasing political support for the plan.

"This paper should be seen as a tool for energy planners to better inform their renewable energy decisions across a densely populated area," said Jacobson. "It is an opportunity to collaborate on a shared system that reduces costs while benefiting a large and important center of electrical demand in the U.S."

The research was supported by the Charles H. Leavell Graduate Fellowship, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Otto Mønsted Foundation. The NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division and NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Computational and Information Systems Laboratory provided access to computational resources and global weather datasets, respectively.

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jet
not rated yet Apr 03, 2012
And.. when the Gov subsidies run out.. they will end up just like the earlier "wind rush" turbines.

http://www.dailym...ush.html