Oracle CEO mulled expansion into smartphones

Apr 17, 2012
Oracle CEO Larry Ellison arrives for a court appearance at a federal building in San Francisco, Tuesday, April 17, 2012. Oracle intends to rely heavily on Google's own internal emails to prove Google's top executives knew they were stealing a popular piece of technology to build the Android software that now powers more than 300 million smartphones and tablet computers. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)

(AP) -- Oracle CEO Larry Ellison says he wanted to compete against Google's Android software in the smartphone market before deciding to sue his potential rival instead.

Ellison acknowledged Oracle's interest in expanding into smartphones while testifying Tuesday in a trial before a jury that will decide the case that Oracle brought against Google.

The outspoken CEO took the stand shortly after a . lawyer argued . launched its legal assault on Android primarily because it couldn't develop its own mobile software.

Ellison testified that he decided against going into smartphones because he concluded it was a bad fit for Oracle, which specializes in database software.

The showdown revolves around Oracle's allegations that Android infringes on the patents and copyrights that Oracle acquired in 2010 when it bought Sun Microsystems.

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SoylentGrin
not rated yet Apr 17, 2012
Patent law confuses me.

Android has been out long before 2010, and using Java with no issues.
So it's possible for a company like Oracle to buy up a patent (or the company that holds it), then change the rules that other companies have been operating under prior to that?
Wouldn't this set the precedent for Oracle, now owning Java, to be able to tell *every* process that uses Java to either stop (forcing many companies out of business) or cut them in on the action (forcing many companies out of business) or any number of ways to dictate operations to thousands of other companies?
packrat
1 / 5 (1) Apr 18, 2012
From what I've read not all of Java was put in the public domain. Google worked around those sections supposedly and Oracle is suing them for working around them. Really confusing info so far.

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