NASA satellite movie shows Great Plains tornado outbreak from space

Apr 17, 2012
This image shows damage left behind from the tornadoes that struck Wichita, Kansas, on April 14, 2012. On April 15, media, Governor Brownback, Mayor Carl Brewer and other city and state officials toured damages. Credit: (Image courtesy KWCH-TV/ Tim VanderZwaag, Wichita, Ks.)

Satellite data gives forecasters a leg up on severe weather. NASA has just released an animation of visible and infrared satellite data showing the development and movement of the Great Plains tornado outbreak, using data from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. There were more than 135 reports of tornadoes and 124 different warnings over April 14-15, 2012.

Local weather observations, soundings, and computer models, and data from satellites like GOES-13 give forecasters information about developing weather situations. The GOES-13 satellite data in animated form showed the forecasters how the area of severe weather was developing, helping to prompt watches and warnings.

The GOES-13 (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) satellite is operated by the . NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the animation of GOES-13 data that covered the period during the massive tornado outbreak.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
This animation of GOES data runs through the period of April 14-15, 2012. The imagery reveals the strong flow of warm, moist air from the Gulf into an advancing cold front. There were more than 135 reports of tornadoes and 124 different warnings during this period. Credit: (Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project)

The GOES animation of the severe weather outbreak is in a large-format HDTV movie that runs 30 seconds. "The animation runs through the period of April 14-15, 2012 and the GOES imagery reveals the strong flow of warm, moist air from the Gulf into the advancing cold front," said Dennis Chesters of NASA's GOES Project.

The destructive outbreak was Saturday night, April 14 to Sunday morning, April 15, and appears half way through the GOES video, when the long streak of clouds springs into view in the middle of the frame. Although there is not much detail in the infrared-only cloud tops, there is evidence of sudden violence.

Meteorologists had predicted the set up for days in advance. In fact, the NOAA Storm Prediction Center Days sent out the alert to more five states to be on guard for developing "extremely dangerous" or "catastrophic" weather conditions. The states included Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Oklahoma, Missouri, Texas, and Illinois.

As factors came together, the National Weather Service forecast this week's Tornado outbreak 24 hours in advance, and gave prompt and urgent warnings that saved lives. Six fatalities were recorded, and there were 213 severe thunderstorm warnings and 124 tornado warnings.

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Newbeak
5 / 5 (3) Apr 17, 2012
For the life of me,I can't understand why people don't rebuild with a safer building method.SIP construction can withstand tornadoes with minimum damage.See this page from one manufacturer's website: http://img189.ima...ados.jpg
It's not perfect,but it is much better than stick built homes for resisting quakes,hurricanes,tornadoes,etc.
Vendicar_Decarian
0.2 / 5 (36) Apr 18, 2012
What is there to understand? It is all God's will, and building stronger buildings is just an act of opposing God's will, and would be a sin.
Vendicar_Decarian
0.2 / 5 (36) Apr 18, 2012
It is sad to see so many Americans suffering from Global Warming.

But so be it... They brought it upon themselves, so they should suffer the consequences of their actions.
rubberman
5 / 5 (1) Apr 18, 2012
It is sad to see so many Americans suffering from Global Warming.

But so be it... They brought it upon themselves, so they should suffer the consequences of their actions.


That depends on who you ask...I hear april 14th is now "naked twister day" in Iran, Cuba, China, Russia and most of the middle east....
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 18, 2012
It is sad to see so many Americans suffering from Global Warming.

But so be it... They brought it upon themselves, so they should suffer the consequences of their actions.

Well,you know what they say,God helps those who help themselves...
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 18, 2012
Naked twister is real fun, but only if you oil up first and your opponents are gender compatible.

"I hear april 14th is now "naked twister day" in Iran, Cuba, China, Russia and most of the middle east...." - Rubberman
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 18, 2012
I've never seen a river of hail before.

http://www.youtub...AvdkKHO0

Or a neighbourhood being bombed by softball sized hail.

http://www.youtub...zOFmO6Dc

And here is a good explanation for the layperson.

http://www.youtub...Zue6ylZ8
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
For the life of me,I can't understand why people don't rebuild with a safer building method.

We're talking rural (and poor), here. No money to build expensive homes.
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
How much does it cost to use metal anchors to attach the roof to the walls and the walls to the foundation?


"No money to build expensive homes." - antialias
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
For the life of me,I can't understand why people don't rebuild with a safer building method.

We're talking rural (and poor), here. No money to build expensive homes.

Middle class communities are victims too.SIP homes are comparable in cost to stick built homes,especially when you factor in construction time (greatly reduced labor costs),and lower HAVCR requirements,as the SIP home is much tighter.Of course,it is assumed those whose homes are destroyed have adequate insurance.
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
How much does it cost to use metal anchors to attach the roof to the walls and the walls to the foundation?


"No money to build expensive homes." - antialias

I guess some protection could be retrofitted into existing homes: http://www.cablet...S_8.aspx
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
How much does it cost to use metal anchors to attach the roof to the walls and the walls to the foundation?

A foundation costs significant money. And a few cables aren't going to do diddly squat against a tornado.
Then there's the damage from all the debris that gets hurled about (which that sort of setup will do nothing to mitigate)

Most of these homes are cheap wood structures for a reason. Putting down solid mortar and brick buildings is expensive (and even those won't survive a direct hit from a tornado)

Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
How much does it cost to use metal anchors to attach the roof to the walls and the walls to the foundation?

A foundation costs significant money. And a few cables aren't going to do diddly squat against a tornado.
Then there's the damage from all the debris that gets hurled about (which that sort of setup will do nothing to mitigate)

Most of these homes are cheap wood structures for a reason. Putting down solid mortar and brick buildings is expensive (and even those won't survive a direct hit from a tornado)


(sigh..) You are the one who brought up cables,I just gave a link to a website discussing them-I don't think they are nearly as good a solution as SIP construction.I still believe if you are building new,or rebuilding after a tornado,SIP construction is smarter than stick built homes.
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
My bad,it was Vendicar who mentioned the cables..
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
IP construction is smarter than stick built homes.

Sure, but it's also more costly (and poor people probably don't own their own homes - they rent. And anyone renting stuff out isn't interested in giving them the best possible home but making the most profit.)

Especially after a tornado you go for chaeap and fast because you need a roof over your head ASAP.

That said: tornado damage is something that is so far down on the probability scale that building for it is probably akin to building your house while thinking about 'meteorite proofing' (I'm exaggerating - but not by much)
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 22, 2012
IP construction is smarter than stick built homes.

Sure, but it's also more costly (and poor people probably don't own their own homes - they rent. And anyone renting stuff out isn't interested in giving them the best possible home but making the most profit.)

Especially after a tornado you go for chaeap and fast because you need a roof over your head ASAP.

That said: tornado damage is something that is so far down on the probability scale that building for it is probably akin to building your house while thinking about 'meteorite proofing' (I'm exaggerating - but not by much)

Well,this method is MUCH faster than stick built,and as I have said,comparable to stick costs.So put up a basic SIP home fast and cheap.If I was renting houses,I'd want something that required minimum repairs after storms.
I don't believe you actually said building for it is akin to meteorite proofing! Every summer,hundreds of homes are lost to tornadoes in the southern U.S.!
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 23, 2012
Nope. I didn't use the word "cable".

"My bad,it was Vendicar who mentioned the cables.." - Newbeak

And all non-mobile homes have foundations.. Although block will not due in Tornado ville.

antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 23, 2012
So put up a basic SIP home fast and cheap.If I was renting houses,I'd want something that required minimum repairs after storms.

Look at the age of current homes. Look at the housing market. You're not going to see many newly built homes for people in the low income range in the near future.

If I was renting houses,I'd want something that required minimum repairs after storms.

Google for pictures on tornado damage. You will see that brick and mortar buildings are as much landfill as stick buildings after a direct hit from a tornado - just a lot more expensive landfill. 'Repair' is not an option in any case.

Every summer,hundreds of homes are lost to tornadoes in the southern U.S.

Hundreds out of tens of millions. That means, on average, you can expect your home to be hit by a tornado every 100000 years. Do you build for such eventualities? No, you don't.
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 23, 2012
Google for pictures on tornado damage. You will see that brick and mortar buildings are as much landfill as stick buildings after a direct hit from a tornado - just a lot more expensive landfill. 'Repair' is not an option in any case.

I'm NOT talking about brick and mortar homes vs. tornadoes-I'm talking about SIP constructed homes being better able to withstand high wind forces.Did you not click on the link I provided? Here it is again: http://img189.ima...ados.jpg
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Apr 24, 2012
Link is not working for me.
But I doubt that these homes look any better than the brick and mortar ones after a tornado strike.

Anyhow: that's completely academic because sinking even one dollar into building for tornado resistance is only marginally more sensible than sinking one dollar into buidling for unicorn resistance.
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 24, 2012
Of course, it is a fact that a home that is tornado resistant is also immediately unicorn resistant.
Newbeak
not rated yet Apr 25, 2012
Link is not working for me.
But I doubt that these homes look any better than the brick and mortar ones after a tornado strike.

Anyhow: that's completely academic because sinking even one dollar into building for tornado resistance is only marginally more sensible than sinking one dollar into buidling for unicorn resistance.

Here is the link to the page I took my first screen grab from: http://starcraftc.../sip.htm

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