Japan bank to install palm-reading ATMs

Apr 13, 2012
A file picture of an employee of Hitachi demonstrating the company's latest auto teller machine (ATM) using a biometric security system to read patterns of users' fingers in Tokyo. A regional bank in central Japan will become the country's first financial institution to adopt automated teller machines that will identify users by their palms.

A regional bank in central Japan will become the country's first financial institution to adopt automated teller machines that will identify users by their palms.

Ogaki Kyoritsu Bank said it would install about a dozen palm-scanning biometric ATMs in late September and planned more in the future.

Under the system, developed by ., users will be able to prove who they are simply by scanning their hands and entering a PIN and date of birth, the bank said.

Demand for a system that does not require a cashcard or a passbook increased after the earthquake-tsunami disaster that ravaged northeast Japan last March in which many people lost personal possessions and were left without the means to get at their money.

The bank said it will be only the second in the world to introduce biometric-dependent ATMs, after Ziraat Bank, Turkey's largest state bank.

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User comments : 6

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XQuantumKnightX
1 / 5 (1) Apr 13, 2012
If any one who is interested in this technology, I have built a Identity Management System called "PalmKey" utilizing the same exact technology. If your interested in purchasing, leasing or co-venturing then contact me at eddie (at) telefuze (dot) com.
tadchem
not rated yet Apr 13, 2012
Palm reading is OK.
Phrenology is OK.
Astrology is OK.
Visceromancy is not OK.
jet
not rated yet Apr 13, 2012
The down side of course is ...

http://news.bbc.c...6831.stm

(short ver.. cut hand raid bank.. get pin in process of taking hand)
HealingMindN
not rated yet Apr 13, 2012
The down side of course is ...

(short ver.. cut hand raid bank.. get pin in process of taking hand)


Yeah, that would be an increase in the black market underground palm shops. At least, they haven't switched to retinal scans...
luinil
not rated yet Apr 13, 2012
First ? I've seen palm reading ATMs at Mitsubishi-UFJ for years now...
Insel_Rowie_Affe
not rated yet Apr 16, 2012
haha

yeah imagine this technology will start a revolution of people with missing hands!!

and who and where is the info kept?? probably sold on for profit

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