Google gives glimpse of Internet glasses

Apr 04, 2012
The Google France offices pictured in 2011. Google gave the world a glimpse of its vision for letting people look at life through Internet-tinted glasses.

Google on Wednesday gave the world a glimpse of its vision for letting people look at life through Internet-tinted glasses.

A video posted at a Project Glass page at Google+ social network confirmed the rumor that the technology titan is working on eyewear that meshes the online world with the real world.

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"We think technology should work for you -- be there when you need it and get out of your way when you don't," members of the project team said in a Google+ post.

"A group of us from Google X (Labs) started Project Glass to build this kind of technology; one that helps you explore and share your world."

Images showed people wearing eyeglasses with stylish silver frames that featured tiny cameras and on-lens displays to discretely show information such as walking directions, weather forecasts or messages from friends.

Built-in microphones let wearers command the Internet-linked glasses by speaking.

"We took a few design photos to show what this technology could look like and created a video to demonstrate what it might enable you to do," Google said, stressing that the glasses were a concept far from being brought to market.

"We're sharing this information now because we want to start a conversation and learn from your valuable input."

The project team invited people to express ideas for the glasses at the Google+ page.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is deeply involved with the California company's X Labs, best known for its work on a self-driving car.

A YouTube video of legally blind Steve Mahan "driving" an autonomous Google car in his California neighborhood has been viewed more than 1.2 million times since it was uploaded on March 27.

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mrlewish
1.4 / 5 (11) Apr 04, 2012
?? talk about liability and distraction. Was expecting him to get run over by a truck. Horrible idea.
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (9) Apr 04, 2012
Yeah the truck driver would have been upset, another pedestrian got in the way of the medical delivery for the local hospital...
TrinityComplex
4.7 / 5 (13) Apr 04, 2012
mrlewish, This is something that has been conceptualized and desired for decades, and you jump in with 'Horrible idea'. It's better than a phone that has you looking away from what should be focused on. At very least you can keep your eyes in the direction of danger. The notifications are out of the way, no worse than a billboard on the side of the road, and it's a person's own responsibility not to do things that distract them when they are doing something that requires their full attention. I don't blame cell phones for people texting while driving and getting into a crash, I blame the person who thought they could get away with something that so many others have died or killed others doing. If you don't like it, don't use it, and learn how to give constructive criticism.
dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (2) Apr 04, 2012
I looked through a display about this size 20 years ago. Admittedly, monochrome but it's a technology that is LONG overdue
powerup1
4.4 / 5 (8) Apr 04, 2012
People like mrlewish will always look for the negative in anything that he is not familiar with, it is just part of his nature. I am sure that he takes advantage of many technologies that if it were left up to him would have never been invented.
Vendicar_Decarian
2.5 / 5 (11) Apr 04, 2012
Constant, irrelevant distractions, augmented with shallow interaction with the real world.

Not a future I want to be a part of.

Gosh... How do I walk to work?

Next questions...

Where do I work? What do I do at work? What is my name? Do I need to empty my colon?

There will be an app for that.
winthrom
4 / 5 (4) Apr 04, 2012
Could be used as a "heads up" display for pilots.
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (30) Apr 04, 2012
Interesting technology, seems to less intrusive than the cell phone and could end up being safer on the road. This idea could eventually replace the smartphone and ipod. Also works as an age detector.
teledyn
1 / 5 (3) Apr 04, 2012
my first thought was the usual, that this ignores the HF-CHI research on HUDs showing that while pilots do well on many tests given the HUD, the one test they reliably fail, the suprise intrusion of a vehicle into their runway, is sadly a major fail -- I kept expecting him to slam into something. Then, as the video went on giving example after example of things we already do very well without the HUD it struck me just how vacuous of an existence this man was leading, and yet he felt so compelled to share so much of it to so many who likely were just being polite.

The real problem with Share My Life is that others, well, they have THEIR lives too, they may not want your Like This stream any more than any of you really want my comment here ;)
Jeddy_Mctedder
1.1 / 5 (8) Apr 04, 2012
this kind of tech might be useful in a facotry or specialized commercial settings, or in high weird forms of entertainment. not in casual daily life where you are just relaxing.

technophiles forget that the ultimate technology is people. machines are always just the intermediaries. the sci-fi hive mind shit where humanity is seamlessly upgraded into a matrix is NOT going to happen without significant leap in progress in neuroscience and neuronal manipulation. and that is something not happening anytime in the next 100 years, and more likely 1000 years. i'm not going to shit on google goggles, quite the opposite. but i think the 'sell' is ALL wrong. i'm not buying this as something i'd want in my daily experience. and i don't think many people would want something like this. why? because i can do ALL the shit this guy did with my galaxy note. without having to wear it on my face.
sirchick
1 / 5 (2) Apr 05, 2012
We won't get this for a longg time, for all we know though the military already have it.

But....

How do you tell the microphone to stop recording if its a pair of glasses, if you have to push a button on the glasses - it defeats the point.... work it out google ..NAO!!!!!
Estevan57
2.3 / 5 (30) Apr 05, 2012
"How do you tell the microphone to stop recording if its a pair of glasses, if you have to push a button on the glasses - it defeats the point.... work it out google ..NAO!!!!!"

The microphone doesn't need a button to start and stop, it is voice activated, and stops when you stop talking. The different functions are keyed to different key words to activate them.
"Remind me to"...to take a note for example.

Many traffic accidents in the future for these wearers. It has the same ability to distract as phones, ipods, netbooks, PDA's, etc.
The biggest attraction seems to be the form factor of being glasses. Google is very smart in allowing a lot of input from the public with this item. People who contribute an idea will have an emotional buy-in and buy this in a flash. Should be interesting to see the finished product.
Silentsam
4 / 5 (4) Apr 05, 2012
It is funny to see the people talking about what a distraction it would be. People who do not pay attention to what they do will find things to distract them. It is not the devices that make people careless.

This could provide a navigation to those who use them while driving without them needing to look away from the road. This device should actually prevent distraction related accidents.

This will be very useful when linked to things like Google Latitude when you are in an unfamiliar place. Also could provide useful information to people looking for assistance.
Vendicar_Decarian
1.5 / 5 (8) Apr 05, 2012
Will these glasses tell Smart Phone users when their diapers are full?

If not, then it will not be serving it's market needs.

And why is the TeliDildonics capability not being reported?
Eikka
3 / 5 (4) Apr 05, 2012
I bet everyone has alreaedy seen the response to Google's video:

http://www.youtub...AOYXT840
shwhjw
2.3 / 5 (3) Apr 05, 2012
Could be used as a "heads up" display for pilots.

As in "Heads up, there's a mountain behind this notification you're about to crash into!"
Maliseil
1 / 5 (2) Apr 05, 2012
That's really good. I totally satisfied.

______________________________________
http://watchtitanic3dmovieonline.metroblog.com/
Eikka
1 / 5 (1) Apr 05, 2012

This could provide a navigation to those who use them while driving without them needing to look away from the road. This device should actually prevent distraction related accidents.


There are some practical issues with eye-projection. It forces you to focus your eyes differently to see the image in sharp detail, which then brings your surroundings ouf of focus, and depending on the distance that the image is projected to, you have to shift the alignment of your eyes and that creates a double image.

Try holding up a fingertip in front of your face and keeping your eyes on it while walking around. You don't see what's behind your finger very clearly. Then try looking past the finger and then back again quickly.

It is distracting, and quite slow.
visual
1 / 5 (2) Apr 06, 2012
"We took a few design photos to show what this technology could look like and created a video to demonstrate what it might enable you to do"

WTF... "could", "might"...
We've had the same coulds and mights for ages now. It is not a new concept.

How about you give us some info about the actual prototype and its abilities right now? About the actual progress that you've made? Is there even any?

Useless PR "news" like this, trying to attract media attention without doing anything real, all while other companies have been bringing real products to market for years now but they get no mention at all... make me sick.
Estevan57
2.1 / 5 (28) Apr 06, 2012
Patience Grasshopper, the prototypes are just now being real time tested. Nothing wrong with Google asking its users what they want in a product, it helps them to design better features. If you go to the website listed and take a look you can find more answers to your questions. They are expecting to be for sale at the end of 2012.
Deathclock
1.9 / 5 (9) Apr 06, 2012
Constant, irrelevant distractions, augmented with shallow interaction with the real world.

Not a future I want to be a part of.

Gosh... How do I walk to work?

Next questions...

Where do I work? What do I do at work? What is my name? Do I need to empty my colon?

There will be an app for that.


Your inability to recognize the non-ridiculous uses and benefits of this is your own problem.
Vendicar_Decarian
3.5 / 5 (2) Apr 06, 2012
Oh, I have uses for it - provided there is sufficient optical resolution. I simply scorn the use that it is being advertised for.

"Your inability to recognize the non-ridiculous uses and benefits of this is your own problem." - DeathTard
Estevan57
2.1 / 5 (28) Apr 06, 2012
Vendi, what would you use it for? Just curious. Assuming adequate resolution.
Vendicar_Decarian
not rated yet Apr 06, 2012
I would use it for everything I use this PC for. Research, news, weather, entertainment, and the occasional email, or chat session.

Emphasis in that order.

The final destination of the computing era is already visible. A personal computer attached to a belt clip or smaller, that will display for the user via glasses, or direct projection onto the eyes, and take direction through a variety of input devices from keyboards and mice to some as yet unspecified hand held twiddler that will provide some combination of the two for mobile use.

Conversion of the device for desktop use will require nothing more than unclipping it from your belt and laying it on a platform behind a desktop monitor/keyboard. From that platform the device will both recharge using near-field inductive coupling and communicate with the desktop devices through a related wireless channel.

Key user information will be backed up to a cloud server and provide unteathered access to personal data.

Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (1) Apr 06, 2012
The Google vision is for the device to augment your experience with the world around you, by automatically recognizing the world around you and automatically providing you with additional information.

This is not how such systems will be used, as can be seen from the large number of criticisms of the video's vision - here and elsewhere.

What will be useful however is the ability to direct requests for additional information from the system. But only as directed by the user.

The system will have to offer passive assistance under the control of the user if it is going to be adopted by anyone.

I would accept a row of passive icons displayed along the right side of my visual field, accessed through a look, hold, blink type response. Icons for various operations like photography, menu, and even QR codes built into various objects in the visual field.

It is essential however that the system present itself in a passive manner that does not distract.

Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (4) Apr 07, 2012
The user interface is very likely to be configurable for a wide range of paradigms. I can see tremendous use for this in medical during surgery, pathology labs. In my own fields of electronics, mechanics & food science, it would be excellent to have detailed information on tap.

Eg. When servicing equipment such as tracing circuit paths, wonderful to have the system follow a schematic path and offer waveforms or voltages & see those in the visual field side by side with the actual waveform when probed.

ie. Being able to read voltage, current, power and especially an oscilloscope display when categorising equipment for power consumption, RF noise, gain, decibels etc. Any parameter to assist in service and repair could be enhanced.

Manufacturing complexity could also be eased, assembly line workers could more easily and quickly shift between tasks.

Biofeedback, watching ones own heart rate and pulse waveform, galvanic resistance, blood pressure etc during meditation exercises - WoW !
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (4) Apr 07, 2012
In respect of biofeedback, would love to find a blood pressure sensing method that doesnt need a constant pressurised cuff, some transmissive infrared differential non interfering technique would be ideal, prob need a specialised calibration run first with a cuff then 'set and forget' that keeps track of blood pressure and waveform characteristics, most important of which is rise time and the so called lag/death rest time - which lengthens when on certain types of medications and can be used as an indicator of risk of sudden heart failure.

ie. A system that, after initial calibration, records blood pressure waveform data without you being constantly reminded its active etc...

Anyone have any ideas ?

Would like it if Google were reading this ;-)

Thanks
MarkyMark
1 / 5 (1) Apr 07, 2012
Somehow i imagine the icons will be DESIGNED to be as unabtrusive as possable!
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (2) Apr 07, 2012
I can see that you do not realize that VR glasses such as these have been available for at least the last decade, in higher resolution and stereo.

There is nothing really new here other than having a major company behind the product.

Sony doesn't count as a real company of course.

"I can see tremendous use for this in medical during surgery, pathology labs. In my own fields of electronics, mechanics & food science, it would be excellent to have detailed information on tap." Mike
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (2) Apr 07, 2012
Probably.

"Somehow i imagine the icons will be DESIGNED to be as unabtrusive as possable!" - Markie

But that isn't how the vision is presented in the official video.

The concept of compute/network connected glasses is not a bad one. It is the official idea for that product that is the failure.
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (4) Apr 07, 2012
Vendicar_Decarian betrayed assumptions of little understanding of others experience
I can see that you do not realize that VR glasses such as these have been available for at least the last decade, in higher resolution and stereo.
Conceptually have been available *at a price* for ~2 decades but without combinatorial complexity of minimal performance hardware in relation to software. I was at Ausgraph 87 in Perth, Western Australia, these types of devices were discussed and conceptual product briefs offered, each required sizable piece of hardware & clunky user interfaces. Now hand-held quad core architectures and wealth of user interface options. Having been involved in the design of electronics since 1982 it is the price/application point that is of interest to me, your pompous egoistic tone shows your immaturity in haste to criticise from oversimplification.

The 'vision' presented is a classic marketing artifice nothing more at this point and *obviously* easily modified.
Moebius
1 / 5 (3) Apr 07, 2012
The video is dishonest showing the guy walking with it, people will drive with it if possible and the inventors know that. This looks like a case of 'we'll invent it if we can make a buck no matter how socially irresponsible it is'.

If people are stupid enough to text while driving you think they won't use this while driving? Not only will they use it but it would be used much more than the people texting now and it would cause massive distraction to drivers. This is a really bad idea unless using it while driving can be totally prevented.
TrinityComplex
not rated yet Apr 09, 2012
Don't put too much stock in the initial showing. It's meant as a rough idea that can be adjusted an built upon. Keeping the icons out of the way, being able to adjust the opacity of virtual objects, types of interface, these are all things that will be adjusted both before the initial release, and in later models. They are advertising this as mostly voice interaction right now, which, if kept out of the primary visual field, would be unobtrusive and significantly less dangerous in most cases than looking at a cell phone. I still think it's a bad idea to actively use while driving, but while walking it wouldn't be much of an impediment. The video making fun of it seems ridiculous though. Yes, there's suddenly a screen in the way, but you knew you were approaching a light post, and you saw someone walking towards you. Even I'm not that uncoordinated. Stop, step to the side, and clear your visual field if you need to. Otherwise, turn the opacity down so you can still see.
TrinityComplex
not rated yet Apr 09, 2012
I would also think that they could do a gesture based interface with the hands. A camera lense at the end of either arm of a pair of glasses would likley be sufficient to allow for distancing information, and some recognition algorithms could indicate what hands are likely those of the wearer instead of someone near them. Yeah, people might look funny manipulating virtual objects, but we'd get used to it, just like we've gotten used to people using their cell phones all the time(still can be irritating, I'll admit).

@Mike: I know that they could get pulse information since the support apparatus would be right next to the temporal artery. I wonder if there might be some non-intrusive way to get blood pressure information as well.