German scientists unveil 'intelligent' tyre for all weather

Apr 24, 2012
Are you fed up of having to change your summer tyres for winter tyres at the first sign of snow? Or of being caught out on a long car journey by sudden changes in the weather? That may soon be a thing of the past, according to a group of researchers at Leipzig university.

Are you fed up of having to change your summer tyres for winter tyres at the first sign of snow? Or of being caught out on a long car journey by sudden changes in the weather?

That may soon be a thing of the past, according to a group of researchers at Leipzig university, who are developing the world's first-ever "intelligent" tyre which automatically adapts itself to the prevailing even while you are driving.

A team of researchers headed by Detlef Riemer at the University of Applied Sciences in Leipzig unveiled the "adaptive tyre" at this year's Hanover Fair, the world's biggest industrial fair taking place in the north German city this week.

"Today's choice of tyres are always a compromise between the ability to brake and petrol consumption," Riemer said.

"The driver has to take into consideration every sort of weather condition and you can't change tyres while you're driving."

But Riemer's "adaptive tyre" is equipped with electronic sensors which recognise different sorts of terrain -- whether or un-tarmacked roads -- and whether it's dry, raining or snowing.

And accordingly, the tyres' profiles are automatically raised or widened accordingly, even when the car is in motion.

"That means your car is always equipped with the best possible tyre and noise and petrol consumption are automatically optimised, too," Riemer enthused.

"The driver no longer has to think about adapting their tyres. The tyre itself 'thinks' too."

The tyre is still a long way from a finished product and research is still ongoing, notably on the materials that can be used for the moveable parts of the tyre's profiles.

"But we've patented it already, just in case," Riemer said.

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RhabbKnotte
1 / 5 (2) Apr 24, 2012
Whew, this takes a load off my mind. I can't tell you how many times I have been driving down the road concerned that I don't have the correcct tires on my car for the conditions. I keep 16 sets of tires, to cover every known driving phenomena, in a trailor behind my car.
Code_Warrior
3 / 5 (2) Apr 24, 2012

The tyre is still a long way from a finished product and research is still ongoing, notably on the materials that can be used for the moveable parts of the tyre's profiles.

"But we've patented it already, just in case," Riemer said.


Translation:
So, I had this idea. Like, if I put sensors in my TIRES and had like, a computer in the TIRE, and had like, some way of moving the treads, I could totally adapt the TIRE to whatever the road conditions are! So my buddy said: "Dude, you could totally patent that." So I did.

What? A prototype? Dude, like what's that? Did I build one? What do you mean? Did I do any kind of experiment to validate the idea? Dude, I have no idea how to do that! But just in case someone else figures it out I can totally take them to court and stuff. Besides, I got my name in Phys.Org! Dude, I totally rocked Phys.Org!
Deathclock
5 / 5 (3) Apr 24, 2012
Whew, this takes a load off my mind. I can't tell you how many times I have been driving down the road concerned that I don't have the correcct tires on my car for the conditions. I keep 16 sets of tires, to cover every known driving phenomena, in a trailor behind my car.


If you live where I live and you don't switch between winter tires and summer tires with the seasons you're an idiot and have probably wrecked your car already.
islatas
4.5 / 5 (2) Apr 24, 2012
If you live where I live and you don't switch between winter tires and summer tires with the seasons you're an idiot and have probably wrecked your car already.


You're probably also aware then that season specific tires are made of completely different materials with different reinforcement and tread patterns/types. A tire that could somehow adapt on the fly to do all these things 'as well' as existing seasonal tires would be incredible...and probably so expensive toting around a trailer with alternative tires and an airgun would be less costly.
Deathclock
not rated yet Apr 24, 2012
You're right, and I'd like to see how they plan on implementing this.

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