Review: Windows 8 a big misstep for Microsoft

Mar 28, 2012 By Troy Wolverton
Windows 8 screenshot

The venerable PC is at a crossroads. Sales growth has slowed to a crawl. And consumers and developers are increasingly turning their time and attention to smartphones and tablets.

Pressured by that trend, is updating to make PCs work more like smartphones and to bring Windows to a whole new class of devices: iPad-like tablets. Last month, the company launched what it calls a "consumer preview" of , the next version of its flagship operating system. The preview is not a final version - that isn't expected until at least this fall - but it's close.

I've been playing around with the Windows 8 preview for several weeks. I loaded it onto a several-year old Dell laptop, in part because that's what I had available and in part to see what users of traditional PCs can expect from the new software. I hope to eventually test out the software on a tablet.

My conclusion: For , Windows 8 is a major misstep.

Perhaps its biggest problem is that it has two separate and largely incompatible parts. It feels like Microsoft took a nice dress and attached it to an equally fine pantsuit and tried to pass it off as one garment. It just doesn't work.

The two pieces are a new interface called "Metro" and the old, traditional desktop inherited from past versions of the software.

The desktop interface looks and works much as it did in Windows 7, except that you won't find a Start button or Start menu, both of which have been core features of the software since Windows 95 debuted about 17 years ago. And you no longer see the desktop when you start up Windows.

Instead, you see the new Metro interface, which Microsoft developed originally for its 7 operating system. The interface is composed of a series of application squares or "tiles" arrayed on a flat background. The app tiles are more than just static program icons; they can display of updated information, such as your next appointment or the current temperature.

When you launch an application designed for the Metro interface, it runs full-screen by default, not inside a window. You can split the screen between two applications, but that's it. Unlike with the desktop, you can't see more than two applications at a time on a single screen.

I actually like the Metro interface on Windows Phone 7 devices. But on a traditional PC, it's a poor fit.

Metro was originally designed to be used with a finger on a touch screen, not with a mouse or trackpad. In order to see a particular app tile on the Metro start screen, for example, you may have to scroll left or right. That's not a problem if you can simply swipe left or right on a touch screen, but it's not such an easy or quick thing to do if you've got to use a trackpad or mouse to click on a scroll bar. I'd much rather use the old-fashioned Start menu.

Another problem with Metro is that, at least for now, most of the Windows applications people use are desktop-style programs. That makes the Metro interface an unnecessary barrier to those applications. I'd like to have my computer just boot up directly into the desktop interface. But Windows 8 forces everyone to begin on the Metro start screen.

So I found myself frequently flipping back and forth between Metro and the desktop, a process that can be disorienting. Because programs for the two interfaces look and work differently, switching between them is like running two different operating systems on the same computer.

The Metro interface is so radically different that much of what users have come to know about Windows for the past 17 years doesn't apply. And the new interface doesn't help them much in figuring out the new steps they need to take to accomplish old tasks.

Take a simple example: closing programs. Since Windows 95, users have typically just clicked on the "x" in the upper right hand corner of the program's window to close it. For those who prefer to use the menu bar, you can usually click on "File" and then "Exit."

But with Metro-style apps, you won't find a close-program "x." You won't even find a menu bar. Instead, to close a program you have to move your pointer to the top edge of the screen, click and hold until the app screen becomes a thumbnail and then drag that thumbnail image to the bottom of the screen. And you have to do all this without any clues: There's nothing to "grab" at the top edge of the screen, and the interface gives you no indication of what you should do with the thumbnail once you've grabbed it.

That's merely one of many commands that are not only different but also hidden by the Metro interface.

Windows 8 is not all bad. It has some great features and incorporates some good ideas.

One of its qualities is speed. It generally starts up, resumes from sleep and shuts down faster than Windows 7. Also, it automatically will synchronize settings - Web bookmarks, desktop images, cursor blink rate and the like - and even apps across multiple computers.

Another cool thing about Windows 8 is the way it works with Web-based services and social networks. With the Metro-style Photos application, you can view pictures you've stored on your local machine on Microsoft's cloud-based SkyDrive service and on websites such as Flickr and Facebook. Similarly, you can save a document to your hard drive or to SkyDrive.

Microsoft officials say users will be able to add on to these services as new Metro apps become available, and that they eventually may be able to pull up photos from Picasa or save documents to DropBox, all from the same dialog box.

But neat features such as these are more than outweighed by the fundamental problems with Windows 8. Microsoft obviously wants to drag the PC into a new era, but the result is an operating system that's much harder to use than the old fashioned one.

---

MICROSOFT WINDOWS 8 CONSUMER PREVIEW:

-Likes: Automatic syncing of settings and applications across multiple computers; quicker startup and shut-down processes; allows easy connection to social media and Web services within apps.

-Dislikes: New interface, dubbed Metro, is radically different in appearance and use from Windows desktop, forcing users to relearn how to use their PC; the interface hides many functions, making it difficult to know how to do even ordinary tasks; the shortage of Metro apps means users will frequently have to flip back and forth between Metro and desktop interfaces; no way to turn off the Metro interface.

-Web: microsoft.com

Explore further: Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

More information: Troy Wolverton is a technology columnist for the San Jose Mercury News.

4.2 /5 (55 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microsoft gives further peek at Windows 8

Aug 30, 2011

Microsoft on Tuesday provided another glimpse at changes coming with the next-generation of Windows software that powers most of the world's computers.

Microsoft Announces Windows Mobile 6.5

Feb 17, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- At the Mobile World Congress 2009 in Barcelona, Microsoft officially revealed the new Windows phones featuring new user-friendly software and services. The next generation of Windows phones ...

Windows 8 readies push-button PC refresh, reset

Jan 05, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Windows 8 is to deliver two new features that could help mute a past history of being the company that delivers blue screens of death and malware magnets. Briefly, Windows 8 is going to make ...

Recommended for you

Watching others play video games is the new spectator sport

20 hours ago

As the UK's largest gaming festival, Insomnia, wrapped up its latest event on August 25, I watched a short piece of BBC Breakfast news reporting from the festival. The reporter and some of the interviewees appeared baff ...

SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

Aug 28, 2014

One of the key concerns about facial recognition software has been over privacy. The very idea of having tracking mechanisms as part of an Internet-connected wearable would be likely to upset many privacy ...

User comments : 52

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

evropej
4.1 / 5 (13) Mar 28, 2012
Microsoft has lost view of the end users. The bread and butter of their industry was based on businesses and end users such as gamers, graphics design, or any productivity interface. With no start button, you can guarantee that all those customers will be gone. You can never make a PC into a tablet or laptop. They call it a PC because it is a PC where you sit down and do some task. I cant wait for the MAC commercials and no I am not a big MAC fan.
Kingsix
4.8 / 5 (4) Mar 28, 2012
Confirms my suspicions.

You're right evropej, I work in an Engineering firm, I design and draft electrical systems for buildings. At this time I have 10 programs open and on my desktop at this time. No sort of mobile system will work better than a regular desktop for the work I do.

I haven't used the windows 8 preview, can you still alt-tab through the programs that you are using?
krundoloss
4.9 / 5 (11) Mar 28, 2012
Oh, Microsoft is so confused. They need to stop trying to make a "better" OS, and just make a Smarter OS. Windows 7 does a decent job, but not for the fancy Aero effects or shiny orbs, but because it automatically searches for hardware drivers, and does a better job of diagnosing problems. I would be happy if Microsoft focused all their energy on Driver functionality, integration with Skydrive or other iCloud clone right out of the box, and overall just better support for functions. We don't need another interface to learn, or something that takes away power from the user. I like making custom toolbars, and arranging windows however I see fit, or changing sound options, the list goes on. Microsoft needs to stop trying to imitate Apple and focus on what Apple cant do - create a dynamic and powerful OS that works well on various hardware platforms. M$ is going to dig their own grave by trying to imitate Apple!
evropej
1.5 / 5 (2) Mar 28, 2012
Confirms my suspicions.
I haven't used the windows 8 preview, can you still alt-tab through the programs that you are using?


I tolerated the OS for 1 hour and then re-imaged my Windows 7 platform. I am not sure if the ALT-TAB option is still available. It would not be an option for me because it does not have a task bar, a start menu or a single reason to make my life easier then what I have now.

Windows Vista and later already caused a havoc with the program structure in windows which required two to three times more clicking to access the same function.

Microsoft is far detached from what the needs are of their end users. I do however speculate that since Apple patents everything now, a mistake they made in the 70's, Microsoft has nothing left to steal for ideas.

The cherry on the cake lies in fact that this is what happens when you outsource all your work to low cost outsourcing firms outside of the US. You get get what you pay for.
krundoloss
5 / 5 (8) Mar 28, 2012
I think its funny that Microsoft seems to make new versions of Windows "just because". They ran out of ideas a long time ago, and they don't know what to do next. The thing is, people just want what they want, and they don't care how they get it. Browse a site on a MAC, or an Iphone, or an Android, or a Windows PC, it doesnt matter? So what makes Microsoft special now? They are the ones that have this huge empire to protect, built on home users first then businesses. Businesses are keeping them up, they should focus on stability, security, functionality and multitasking. They should not focus on fad-based interfaces and eye-candy! Desktop computers are around for a reason - You can do more work with a dedicated setup!
Doug_Huffman
3 / 5 (7) Mar 28, 2012
Windoze XP is my last M$ OS. Fedora 16 is on the other HDD and I am climbing the learning curve. Buh bye, Bill.
epsi00
5 / 5 (3) Mar 28, 2012
They ran out of ideas a long time ago, and they don't know what to do next...
Businesses are keeping them up, they should focus on stability, security, functionality and multitasking.


They would know that if they listened to their customers. But like all gigantic companies, they don't. Their arrogance, not Apple, will bring down them down

TrinityComplex
4.1 / 5 (11) Mar 28, 2012

They would know that if they listened to their customers. But like all gigantic companies, they don't. Their arrogance, not Apple, will bring down them down


This has been said several times over the lives of both Apple and Microsoft. One bad operating system is not going to ruin Microsoft (Vista and ME ring a bell?). Also, the idea behind Windows 8 is aimed at more than just a new look to be manipulated with a mouse and keyboard. Remember that Microsoft made the Kinect, which has had huge success in that people have done all kinds of different things with it, not just gaming. The Metro interface is designed to work well with a gesture based interface like the Kinect. Likely, Microsoft will do as they have in the past and let people revert to the older styles if they prefer to use things that way. This is just the demo, after all. The 'Microsoft's going to die' talk after every OS announcement is getting rather old.
that_guy
4.6 / 5 (9) Mar 28, 2012
Oh, Microsoft is so confused. They need to stop trying to make a "better" OS, and just make a Smarter OS. Windows 7 does a decent job....imitate Apple and focus on what Apple cant do - create a dynamic and powerful OS that works well on various hardware platforms. M$ is going to dig their own grave by trying to imitate Apple!

I think you have an excellent point.

The desktop experience hasn't changed much in the past decade. We use a mouse, keyboard, and a screen, just like always.

I believe the desktop OS has reached an interface point where there isn't much left to optimize on the interface.

Interface design only needs to be optimized at this point when something under the hood has been optimized better to begin with.

and grudgingly, I have to point out that apple has realized this, which is why it is still OSX.

Tablets require an entirely different OS, and should not be mashed with the desktop.
canuckit
Mar 28, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
evropej
1 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2012
An elephant is eaten one t-spoon at a time. When Me came out, linux was born. When Vista came out, MAC came to the spotlight and linux took a huge step forward and gained a lot of market share. When 8 comes out, you will have more of the same.

I love some of the comments though, can you imagine your corporate job and the people working with their faces lol. What will you do when you are frustrated at the pc and the pc knows what you are saying ROFL?

If it wasnt for the ram limitation, I would not have upgraded to windows 7. I wish someone hacked the 32 bit version of xp to use more ram.
Infinion
2.4 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2012
Bill's already gone Doug, you should say buh bye to Steve Ballmer instead
jamesrm
not rated yet Mar 28, 2012
"One bad operating system is not going to ruin Microsoft (Vista and ME ring a bell?)"

So if Win8 is as bad as it seems thats strike 3? :)
The evil that makes W8 neces-scary to M$ is forcing the use "trusted platform" and "treacherous computing" in future Win tables and desktops.

http://en.wikiped...m_Module
http://en.wikiped...omputing
beware
L_J
not rated yet Mar 28, 2012
Trying to emulate smart phones and pads. Forget emulating them, try surpassing them. If someone from Microsoft wants tips on what they need to do then just get in touch with me.
kochevnik
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 28, 2012
Kubuntu linux. Live DVD desktop. Tested with a lot of desktop hardware. Frequent updates which are easy with muon package manager. Full encryption for laptops. Supported by thirty bright programmers who understand that software must work coherently. Free or commercial support. Run other operating systems like winblows and macintoy with Virtualbox.
that_guy
3 / 5 (2) Mar 28, 2012
An elephant is eaten one t-spoon at a time. When Me came out, linux was born. When Vista came out, MAC came to the spotlight and linux took a huge step forward and gained a lot of market share. When 8 comes out, you will have more of the same.

Why are you trying to prove a point only on the bad half of the windows operating systems? That's cherry picking and invalidates whatever conclusion you were trying to make (Which I'm not sure was clear either)

Every second operating system that MS makes is usually pretty decent. MAC and Linux in the spotlight? come on! Combined, they own less than 10% of the desktop OS market. If linux doubles from 200 to 400 users, it still doesn't matter to anyone.

What MS needs to do, is leave their Desktop OS (Where they crushed everyone else) alone, and go compete separately for the mobile market.
JamesK
4.8 / 5 (4) Mar 28, 2012
I have to do it, I'll defend microsoft.
1) Don't autohate because you will need to learn something new. Change is scary, you can learn

2)Change is needed to stay in the game. No one in the tech world can sit on their laurels forever. If Win 8 flops, then atleast they tried rather than remaining in the stone age.

3)Its still Windows 7 at heart. The standard desktop is there, with several underlying improvements. If the startmenu means that much to you, stick with windows 7 and pick up windows 9 once everything has been figured out.

4)Macs and Linux are going the same direction, look at the app store for OSX or the new ubuntu unity interface.

5)Average people are consumers not creators. People like data piped to them a la updating tiles and other UI elements. Are we really going to crucify windows because they're giving people what they want? Windows can't depend on business revenue forever to stay relevant.

Personally, I probably won't buy 8 but I can appreciate the effort given.
javjav
not rated yet Mar 28, 2012
At least you will not need to press the start button when what you want is to stop it.

Seriously, I do not know anybody who goes to a PC for doing something that he can do with a smartphone. You will only seat in front of a PC when you need the speed and precision of "PC" interface peripherals. You use a PC when you need a bigger screen, or a keyboard, or a mouse, or all of them, and in general any kind of peripheral that requires to work in a desktop. These peripherals are not an obsolete thing at all, they are still the main reason to use a PC. You only use it when the smartphone or tablet interface is not enough. So why Microsoft wants to force us to use the smartphone interface on it!
that_guy
4.2 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2012
If it wasnt for the ram limitation, I would not have upgraded to windows 7. I wish someone hacked the 32 bit version of xp to use more ram.

It's called windows XP x64 edition. You cannot address more than ~3 to 4 GB of Ram in a singular system with 32 bit registers.

No amount of hacking win XP 32 would change the fact that you would need a physically separate memory bank for each 3GB you add, and the increased overhead caused by sending two separate commands for each ram fetch.

A much more elegant solution would be to lengthen the command size to say...64bits? that way you get more headroom with virtually no performance hit. what a wonderful idea.
OverweightAmerican
5 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
I disagree with most other comments here. I think MS are on the right track with windows 8 and they only need to improve a couple of things.

If they implement some usability improvements (eg: the ability to turn metro off and make metro interactions more intuitive) they will have an OS which is the best of both worlds. It will be an OS that works well on PCs plus an extremely powerful tablet OS, much more comprehensive than iOS or andriod.

Moreover, MS support and listen to the developer community much more than the other mainstream platforms and have an incredibly comprehensive development framework with .Net which means it's more cost effective to develop MS software.
thuber
1 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
This is simply Microsoft attempting to push people into cloud computing and away from PCs with localized storage. They are trying the same stupidity with the next version of the XBOX360 (there are industry rumors that it will have no internal storage), but they will simply alienate customers. No growth is NOT the same thing as no sales. The PC Industry is huge and will continue to be so. Windows is based on research done in the 70s at Xerox PARC. Automobiles are 100 years old, but they too are not going away. Microsoft has made one strategic misstep after another. There is no compelling business or technical reason to merge PCs with smaller less capable devices. Every attempt they have made to merge markets has failed, and this one will too. In the case of Vista, it was a failed attempt to merge PCs with TV via windows media player enhancements. In the current case, its trying to force people onto the cloud, and it too will fail.
TrinityComplex
5 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
I love some of the comments though, can you imagine your corporate job and the people working with their faces lol. What will you do when you are frustrated at the pc and the pc knows what you are saying ROFL?

If it wasnt for the ram limitation, I would not have upgraded to windows 7. I wish someone hacked the 32 bit version of xp to use more ram.

What are you talking about? The term is 'Gesture', not 'visible emotion'. Also, hacking a 32 bit version of anything to use more RAM is only going to go so far, due to the restrictions of 32-bit programming (maximum usage is 2^32 bytes=4 gigabytes). The move to a 64-bit system was necessary to get past this restriction (2^64 bytes=16 exabytes, or 16777216 terabytes).
On slate computers you interface with touch gestures. Apple had to create an entirely new OS for this, whereas part of the idea behind Win8 is that you can have the same OS, with full capability (iOS is painfully limited) without a ton of reprogramming.
Eikka
4.3 / 5 (6) Mar 28, 2012
You are all forgetting history.

Microsoft does a two-step dance with every new version. They make a bad version that nobody likes and few will use so that in comparison, the next version would look even better.

98 - 98SE
ME - XP
Vista - 7
8 - ???
kochevnik
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 28, 2012
Every second operating system that MS makes is usually pretty decent. MAC and Linux in the spotlight? come on! Combined, they own less than 10% of the desktop OS market. If linux doubles from 200 to 400 users, it still doesn't matter to anyone.
91% of all supercomputers use Linux. Android is half the mobile market. Winblows is best for games. Easy to run it in Virtualbox then shut it down when you have some work to do.
evropej
3.4 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2012
I based all my statements from two perspectives:
1. From a corporation stand point
2. From a power user stand point

I have an iPad and a iPhone to check my email, web, eBay, weather, read, facebook and so on at home and on the go. I dont need to be sitting down in front of my desktop with 10 inch tiles which can be seen from 100 feet away on my dual 23 inch monitors, with a 4.14GHz quad core, and 24G Ram to do this.

I need a mouse, a keyboard, a big screen and a work station to do my work. A concept foreign to people in Microsoft and the die hard fans who support them.

References to MAC and Linux were made as an indication of loss in market share and horrible OS design failure.

PS Clicking 2 times, clicking 6 times, clicking 18 is not enhancing an OS for the same task. Just a FYI to the brilliant minds out there.
Callippo
1 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
Microsoft has lost view of the end users.
The tablets without HW keyboard aren't suitable for productive work - therefore the lack of older interface would be perceived as a mess especially at the corporate sector. I don't quite understand, why Microsoft cannot support both GUI interfaces (Aero and Metro) together at least one version of Windows. I got the same problem during switching to MS Office 2007 version with its silly Ribbon menu bar. Now I'm using all versions of Office fluently - but I still don't perceive the Ribbon as a great improvement of GUI. Isn't the lack of backward compatibility just a laziness of programmers?
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Mar 28, 2012
Seems every two versions Microsoft makes a blunder

95 was unstable
98 was much improved
ME was a desaster
XP was actually pretty good.
Vista...let's not go there...
Windows 7 is pretty decent

So if they want to stick to their rhythm then Windows 8 had to be not-so-great.

I'm sticking with MY system: waiting for the next OS after Windows 8 until I upgrade.
that_guy
3.2 / 5 (5) Mar 28, 2012
MAC and Linux Linux in the spotlight? come on! Combined, they own less than 10% of the desktop OS market. If linux doubles from 200 to 400 users, it still doesn't matter to anyone.
91% of all supercomputers use Linux. Android is half the mobile market. Winblows is best for games. Easy to run it in Virtualbox then shut it down when you have some work to do.

Desktop Windows cannot work on mobile devices. So Android is an invalid comparison.

Supercomputers virtually all use heavily modified and customized OS's. Using linux so you don't have to ask microsoft's permission or experts to make changes is definitely an advantage. Also, there are linux kernels available that are more geared to massively parallel computing than MS Windows, which is marketed as a desktop OS, not a Supercomputer OS.

Also, you omitted the fact that I specifically referred to desktop OS, so you could try to make your retarded point.
btb101
3.3 / 5 (4) Mar 28, 2012
And nobody has mentioned the now confirmed kill switch. the little software switch that allows m/s to turn your dodgy software on or off.. With the interface looking more like the xbox interface, generally hated by all, i really think this will spell the start of the end for m/s..

a good idea at the start, put a pc on almost every desk, but now its time to say bye bye..
Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (2) Mar 28, 2012
It is long past time for Ball Boy Ballmer to go.
aroc91
2 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
It would not be an option for me because it does not have a task bar, a start menu or a single reason to make my life easier then what I have now.


I'm reluctant to grant credibility to anything you say considering Windows 8 clearly has a taskbar and a start button.

What would you call that at the bottom of the screen?

http://cdn.blogsd...ws-8.png

Edit: Unless, of course, you're using the tablet layout, in which case, you'll find it's optional and you can switch back to the traditional desktop layout.
evropej
3.2 / 5 (6) Mar 28, 2012
I'm reluctant to grant credibility to anything you say considering Windows 8 clearly has a taskbar and a start button.

What would you call that at the bottom of the screen?

http://cdn.blogsd...ws-8.png


That is the previous version which was release last year with a registry hack ( remove in current release ). Please enlighten us all and tell me how many of the general users can find that switch? I will give you a clue, most users wont bother wasting time restoring features in Windows 8 which they already have in previous versions.

As a simple example, change the background in windows xp and count the clicks. Change the background in windows 7 and count the clicks. Change the background in windows 8 and count the clicks. At the end, take the number of clicks and multiply them by the time to get the suckage factor everyone is complaining about. Its not a mystery, clicking more is not innovation.
hyongx
not rated yet Mar 28, 2012
I'm just waiting for an OS with integrated voice command support.

"Open Browser" "Go to Physorg.com" should be recognized commands.
mayan
1 / 5 (1) Mar 28, 2012
Checkout new Processors & OS at
http://communitie...6#145846

Tim_Riches
not rated yet Mar 29, 2012
So they turned the whole OS into their gadget platform? The one I purged from Win7 with extreme prejudice?
raykelly1940
1 / 5 (1) Mar 29, 2012
I am wondering if we can create light by copying the bioluminescent mechanism or we may be able to improve it
has any body got knowledge in this field?
Callippo
3 / 5 (2) Mar 29, 2012
Seems every two versions Microsoft makes a blunder
95 was unstable
98 was much improved
There's a theory, the SW with even-numbered versions are of lower quality. As far as I can tell, the Corel versions did behave in similar way. Open source SW used odd-numbered versions for development releases instead.
mayan
1 / 5 (1) Mar 29, 2012
Checkout new Processors & OS at http://communitie...6#145846
mayan
1 / 5 (1) Mar 29, 2012
Microsoft is clever in marketing techniques, produce junk, then in next version correct it.....
mayan
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2012
THESE WILL BE INCLUDED IN NEXT RECESSION

The end of software, Employees fired recently, stocks down, going back to 19th century (best year) and some countries to stone age.

The chip fabrication limits have come to an end. If fewer than 100nm process is used , the chip life is reduced and fails commercially. However with 90nm and dual core processors the software and hardware industry has boomed with many new versions of Operating Systems, each OS cleverly designed with certain features on only some CPU's for profit making issues.

False statement are made by professors and research people to claim that in coming months more powerful chips will come which matches the brain, current chips just struggle with an acrobat reader and the chips have reached limits.

From windows 98 to win XP to win7 the OS evolved to multicore cpu compatibility, but as cpu hierarchy came to limits, the microsoft like companies have nothing to develop and nearly 70% of the employees (continued-1)
mayan
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2012
(continued-1)
have nothing to do and will be fired in few months.

Till now these companies had the strategy of upgrading from one OS to other OS taking feed back from customers (crash report feed back form) and universities and developed win2000 to winxp to win7

People dont need bulky OS which doesnt have additional features when compared with older versions.

The software OS versions size have bloated from few MB to 100's of MB without any additional functionalities, these bloats are due to implementation of security features, there will be further bloat in OS and ram.

Finally these companies will concentrate on business applications office clerical work rather than software design.

Only search engine companies will succeed with their cloud capabilities.The reason behind microsoft tried to buy yahoo is to step into cloud. It shifted to Midori.The reason behind microsoft tried to buy yahoo is to step into cloud.

(continued-2)
mayan
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2012
(continued-2)

New Chip production with new hierarchies will be ended, but Old hierarchy will be maintained like 2009 hierarchy

as no necessity is there for new hierarchy. As Unnecessary new instructions, round about computation instructions, are put in new chips which are not needed same with data transfers.

Chips grow older new same ones with same design will be manufactured. Hardware support Industry like Main Boards etc will be there for ever as hardware go older replacement is needed. Some like Sun shifted to iphone, ipod, ipad etc as software limits reached.

Intel & Microsoft tried to have monopoly by having their secret instruction & OS.

Giving OLPC to child is like giving him a calculator to do maths instead of asking him to by-heart the multiplication tables. This reduces his learning abilities by giving OLPC.

(continued-3)
mayan
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2012
(continued-4)

Bill tried to produce a Microsoft TV, wonder if he integrated pop vending machine into the Gates TV, Pepsi (Best Drink) vending machine into Bill's TV. This would shun SANYO the worlds best giant, which was down after the digital age. The reason behind Bills TV is that software reached limits and he needs to shift market.

Silicon valley firmware and software companies will be closed as new software's are not needed due to maturity of chip.Gold and other support minerals used in chip and hardware like Tantalum, copper are now scarce , the cpu and other hardware price will rise, Lithium battery price rises etc etc....

Finally going back to 19th century and maybe some countries to 15th.In few years electricity production goes down and transport will be rare due to petroleum unavailability. RadioWaves is good invention, mobiles are just manipulation of radio wave.

Most of the countries will be enjoying their 18-19 century world(nice world)..

(end)
krundoloss
5 / 5 (5) Mar 29, 2012
evropel - You get what Im talking about. I dont need tiles on a desktop! They belong on a phone and a tablet, and maybe a notebook depending on what Im doing. A desktop is insulted by a tablet like interface. No one wants to touchscreen a desktop because your shoulders get tired and its pointless when you have a mouse.

Oh and I completely agree that they need to stop layering the dam settings so deep. I think they call it Windows 7 becuase it takes atleast 7 steps to get anything done!
evropej
1 / 5 (3) Mar 29, 2012
Oh and I completely agree that they need to stop layering the dam settings so deep. I think they call it Windows 7 becuase it takes atleast 7 steps to get anything done!


That is got to be the best analogy of the new interface I have ever heard or read lol. That one is going into the piggy bank.

I dont see how people think the new OS is more productive or intuitive? The aero interface and the icons are about the only thing better but you can do that in XP if you like. Oh, windows media player is about the only thing that is truly much better in windows 7. But the rest is just comical. My analogy is that someone took a binder which was organized nicely and tossed them in the air and I believe this was the result of outsourcing the os to multiple contract companies and then stitched it together. A common theme in most of the interfaces. I will not talk about the start menu, I dont use it period. The advanced search was another feature that I miss all the time. Out of text lol...
technodiss
1 / 5 (1) Mar 31, 2012
meh. custom computer, custom OS. ie Linux distro. once you get used to the interface and the command line, it works. and it works well. even main stream software companies are developing (non open source) solutions for corporate use as well as professional quality multimedia production suites.
oh, and i think the start button came with windows 3.1
Kanaida
not rated yet Mar 31, 2012
I completely agree that the interface should be left on 3 types of devices, phones, tables, and televisions. A pc is a more hardcore workstation device, and in an office it's very unlikely to use any kind of touch interface. I tried it and i didn't know if i was looking at a login screen, if it was just frozen or what. How the hell was i supposed to know i had to drag the screen to login. I mean I was using a mouse for god's sake and there was no text telling me to do anything. I almost didn't even log in at all and i've been using computers since DOS. All I wanted was the same windows, but for them to tune every bit of code for performance and less memory usage. Perhaps isolate application installs into their own separate registry to solve stuff. Unfortunately linux distros are headed this way too like ubuntu with their unity crap, and gnome 3/ gnome shell. Linux mint is the only distro that meets us half way and the performance from 11 -> 12 went to crap.
tekram
not rated yet Mar 31, 2012
Go over to cnn dot com and read what a Mac user thinks of Win8:
Mac user: Why I love Windows 8
By Steve Kovach, Business Insider
March 28, 2012 -- Updated 1406 GMT (2206 HKT)
kuntur2k
not rated yet Apr 01, 2012
Expect Microsoft to change the name of Windows 8 to Windows something. The name change will counter what some believe is the EVEN version curse.
Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (1) Apr 01, 2012
Baaaaaaaaaaaallllllllllmerrrrrrrrrrr
Baaaaaaaaaaaaaallllllllllllmmmmmmmmmerrrrrrrrrrrrr
Baaaaaaaaaaaaaaalllllllllllllllmmmmmmmmmmmmerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Is he trying to sink his own company?

If he is, he is doing a great job. If not then he is incompetent.

Give the guy a golden Clippie handshake and get a Microsoft Bob in there who knows what the Bing they are doing. Do it Zune, before it's too late.

kkroy
not rated yet Apr 02, 2012
Strange evropej is putting the blame on overseas firms for Microsoft's follies. The quintessential copycats are trying to be all things to all people & that is making them a laughing stock.
andyrdj
2 / 5 (1) Apr 03, 2012
It's annoying that every time something new comes out, the old is automatically regarded as "outdated" and that anyone who thinks the new interface is worse is somehow backward.

If anyone tried to advance a scientific theory that way, they'd be shot down! A good scientific theory must stand by its own merit, and incorporate all of the successes of its predecessors, rather than assume it's correct just because it arrives later than the others!

This should be applied to software development. The metro UI did not need to take over the entire operating system, it could have been an application you launched from the desktop or the start menu. If you wanted to skip this step, add the shortcut to the startup folder.

An example of good practice is the skins on older versions of windows media player. You could swtich between a lightweight graphic GUI or the full kaboodle. Everyone's happy.

Now, I have to fight to get to the advanced functions. Crap! Linux, anyone?
Zoso69
not rated yet Apr 19, 2012
Call me stupid, cuz I installed the Windows 8 demo on both my laptop and desktop. That meant that I had twice the work (and time) to get back to Windows 7 on both computers. I used Windows 8 off an on for a day or two and concur with most of the other posts that it is simply a mess and some number of steps backwards compared to V7. I knew that rolling back to V7, and installing all the software would be a dozen hour time black hole. I'm glad I invested in those 12 hours. It will be interesting to see how Microsoft reacts to all of the negative comments being made about Windows 8. Can they really release this product as is?