Venus and Jupiter cuddling up in night sky

Mar 12, 2012 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
Stars

It's not too late to catch the spectacular Venus and Jupiter show.

On Monday and Tuesday evenings, the planets will appear just 3 degrees apart in the western sky. The gap has been narrowing since last month.

The two planets are visible every night at twilight. Venus is brighter because of its relative closeness, compared with super-far-away Jupiter.

Even though the gap will widen, the planets will appear remarkably close all week and be easily visible the rest of this month. So says Tony Phillips, author of the spaceweather.com website. Grab a , and you can also catch Jupiter's four largest moons.

Astronomers consider it the best evening tag-up of Venus and in years. In July, early-risers will be treated to a similar spectacle, in the eastern sky at daybreak. Phillips says throw in the crescent moon, and it "will be worth waking up for."

Explore further: Bright points in Sun's atmosphere mark patterns deep in its interior

More information: Phillips' web site: http://spaceweather.com/

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CaliforniaDave
5 / 5 (4) Mar 12, 2012
It's a shame you couldn't ask Dr. Phillips if you could have used one of the lovely pictures of this event he has on his website to illustrate this article, instead of the indeterminate shot of some random star cluster you appear to have picked.
tkjtkj
not rated yet Mar 13, 2012
It's a shame you couldn't ask Dr. Phillips if you could have used one of the lovely pictures of this event


ya.. and welcome to physorg! "Where we never fail to omit any explanatory photo!"
It does seem to be the editors' points of view .. sadly.
And complaints will go nowhere .. so dont even think of trying!

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