New online energy harvesting data repository launched

Mar 09, 2012
The Energy Harvesting Open Access Data Repository is an online resource for researchers worldwide. Credit: University of Southampton

Energy data from sources such as human motion, wind speeds and light irradiance that could be used to power wireless electronic devices is being made available to the world's scientific community, thanks to a new resource being launched this month.

The Open Access Data Repository is an online resource for researchers worldwide to share detailed data on and characteristics. It will be launched at the annual conference of the Energy Harvesting Network 'Energy Harvesting 2012'. The Network, which is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and managed by the University of Southampton, brings together UK academic and industrial researchers and end-users of energy harvesting technology.

Energy harvesting is a means of powering wireless electronic devices by scavenging many low grade ambient energy sources, such as environmental vibrations, human motion, thermal gradients and light, so they can be converted into usable electrical energy. Energy harvesting devices are potentially attractive as replacements for primary batteries in low power wireless . They also hold the possibility of one day enabling the powering of a range of devices not currently possible, including implantable and wearable medical devices.

At present the data available for download includes detailed vibration data from a variety of transport and machinery applications and will be expanded to include data on wind, light irradiance and human body motion. All data is contributed by the community, and researchers are encouraged to upload their data. All data is available for free download and allows researchers to compare and evaluate their energy harvesting designs and analysis using a common dataset. The repository can be viewed by visiting eh-network.org/data

Dr Geoff Merrett, lecturer in Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton and coordinator of the Energy Harvesting Network, says: "New energy harvesting devices and systems are being continually reported, but there is little standardisation in the way in which their performance is evaluated or compared. We have launched this data repository to not only provide researchers with real data to experiment with, but also to allow comparison between different devices using the same data. Obviously the success of the repository relies on its adoption by the community, both in using the data but also in further contributing to it, and I strongly encourage researchers to do so."

The 'Energy Harvesting 2012' event, on Wednesday 28 March in London, provides a platform for disseminating energy-harvesting advances in the UK, and contains presentations from well-respected speakers from academia and industry, demonstrations from companies, and posters from postgraduate students. Registration costs £50 (a subsidised rate of £25 is available for academics), while PhD students that bring and present a poster can attend for free (there are only a few poster spaces left).

Speakers at the event include Professor Peter Woias (IMTEK, Germany), Frank Schmidt (CTO Enocean), Professor Vittorio Ferrari (University of Brescia, Italy), Roy Freeland (Perpetuum) and Professor Eric Yeatman (Imperial College, London). For further information and instructions on how to register, please visit http://eh-network.org/events/eh2012.php

Explore further: First of four Fukushima reactors cleared of nuclear fuel

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Raiders of the lost amp

Jul 05, 2011

Energy harvesting is a process that captures energy that would otherwise be lost as heat, light, sound, vibration or motion. It can use this captured energy to improve the efficiency of existing systems or even to power new ...

Good vibrations

Mar 23, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Energy harvesting - using vibrations from the environment to produce electricity - has been around for over a decade, but Dr Stephen Burrow and his team in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University ...

Nanogenerators for energy harvesting technology

Jul 09, 2010

The journal, Nano Letters, recently published an article highlighting the fascinating nanogenerators developed by Dr. Yong Shi, a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stevens Institute of Technology. The pa ...

Recommended for you

The state of shale

Dec 19, 2014

University of Pittsburgh researchers have shared their findings from three studies related to shale gas in a recent special issue of the journal Energy Technology, edited by Götz Veser, the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor of Che ...

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

Dec 18, 2014

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

Dec 18, 2014

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.