New online energy harvesting data repository launched

Mar 09, 2012
The Energy Harvesting Open Access Data Repository is an online resource for researchers worldwide. Credit: University of Southampton

Energy data from sources such as human motion, wind speeds and light irradiance that could be used to power wireless electronic devices is being made available to the world's scientific community, thanks to a new resource being launched this month.

The Open Access Data Repository is an online resource for researchers worldwide to share detailed data on and characteristics. It will be launched at the annual conference of the Energy Harvesting Network 'Energy Harvesting 2012'. The Network, which is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and managed by the University of Southampton, brings together UK academic and industrial researchers and end-users of energy harvesting technology.

Energy harvesting is a means of powering wireless electronic devices by scavenging many low grade ambient energy sources, such as environmental vibrations, human motion, thermal gradients and light, so they can be converted into usable electrical energy. Energy harvesting devices are potentially attractive as replacements for primary batteries in low power wireless . They also hold the possibility of one day enabling the powering of a range of devices not currently possible, including implantable and wearable medical devices.

At present the data available for download includes detailed vibration data from a variety of transport and machinery applications and will be expanded to include data on wind, light irradiance and human body motion. All data is contributed by the community, and researchers are encouraged to upload their data. All data is available for free download and allows researchers to compare and evaluate their energy harvesting designs and analysis using a common dataset. The repository can be viewed by visiting eh-network.org/data

Dr Geoff Merrett, lecturer in Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton and coordinator of the Energy Harvesting Network, says: "New energy harvesting devices and systems are being continually reported, but there is little standardisation in the way in which their performance is evaluated or compared. We have launched this data repository to not only provide researchers with real data to experiment with, but also to allow comparison between different devices using the same data. Obviously the success of the repository relies on its adoption by the community, both in using the data but also in further contributing to it, and I strongly encourage researchers to do so."

The 'Energy Harvesting 2012' event, on Wednesday 28 March in London, provides a platform for disseminating energy-harvesting advances in the UK, and contains presentations from well-respected speakers from academia and industry, demonstrations from companies, and posters from postgraduate students. Registration costs £50 (a subsidised rate of £25 is available for academics), while PhD students that bring and present a poster can attend for free (there are only a few poster spaces left).

Speakers at the event include Professor Peter Woias (IMTEK, Germany), Frank Schmidt (CTO Enocean), Professor Vittorio Ferrari (University of Brescia, Italy), Roy Freeland (Perpetuum) and Professor Eric Yeatman (Imperial College, London). For further information and instructions on how to register, please visit http://eh-network.org/events/eh2012.php

Explore further: Going nuts? Turkey looks to pistachios to heat new eco-city

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Raiders of the lost amp

Jul 05, 2011

Energy harvesting is a process that captures energy that would otherwise be lost as heat, light, sound, vibration or motion. It can use this captured energy to improve the efficiency of existing systems or even to power new ...

Good vibrations

Mar 23, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Energy harvesting - using vibrations from the environment to produce electricity - has been around for over a decade, but Dr Stephen Burrow and his team in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University ...

Nanogenerators for energy harvesting technology

Jul 09, 2010

The journal, Nano Letters, recently published an article highlighting the fascinating nanogenerators developed by Dr. Yong Shi, a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stevens Institute of Technology. The pa ...

Recommended for you

Obama launches measures to support solar energy in US

Apr 17, 2014

The White House Thursday announced a series of measures aimed at increasing solar energy production in the United States, particularly by encouraging the installation of solar panels in public spaces.

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

Apr 17, 2014

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'

For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look "whiter than white," but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different ...

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years

(Phys.org) —Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth. Scientists ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...