NMR sheds new light on polymorphic forms in pharmaceutical compounds

March 7, 2012

Scientists at the University of Warwick have used state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to shed new light on how pharmaceutical molecules pack together in the solid state.

Researchers made use of the UK's largest solid-state NMR magnets, housed at the University of Warwick, to carry out the study in collaboration with Astra Zeneca and GlaxoSmithKline.

The analytical methods look directly at the hydrogen and that are at the heart of so-called which control how organic molecules self-assemble into different three-dimensional solid-state structures.

Professor Steven P. Brown from the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick said: "Screening polymorphic forms of is a key part of pharmaceutical development."

"The combination of high magnetic field and novel rf pulse methodologies are allowing us to look by NMR with high precision at the distinct intermolecular hydrogen bonding arrangements that help us understand why pharmaceutical molecules adopt different polymorphic forms."

"By using the University of Warwick's state-of-the-art facilities we are able to shed new light on this complex area."

Explore further: NMR researchers unlock hydrogen’s secrets to spot polymorphism in pharmaceuticals

More information: The two papers are available to view at the following links:

Bradley et al. J. Pharm. Sci. onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jps.23078/abstract
Tatton et al., CrystEngComm pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2012/CE/c2ce06547a

Related Stories

Scientists discover new method for studying molecules

November 17, 2010

Researchers at Queen's University have discovered the method for studying oxygen in large molecular systems. The findings will help in the study of proteins, DNA, RNA and other molecular structures.

Quantum error correction in solid state processing

November 16, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- "Liquid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been successful for quantum information processing,” Osama Moussa tells PhysOrg.com. “However, there are some questions about scalability and other ...

Recommended for you

Why cryptophyte algae are really good at harvesting light

December 8, 2016

In an algae-eat-algae world, it's the single-celled photosynthetic organisms at the top (layer of the ocean) that absorb the most sunlight. Underneath, in the sublayers, are cryptophyte algae that must compete for photons ...

Chemical trickery corrals 'hyperactive' metal-oxide cluster

December 8, 2016

After decades of eluding researchers because of chemical instability, key metal-oxide clusters have been isolated in water, a significant advance for growing the clusters with the impeccable control over atoms that's required ...

Oxygen can wake up dormant bacteria for antibiotic attacks

December 8, 2016

Bacterial resistance does not come just through adaptation to antibiotics, sometimes the bacteria simply go to sleep. An international team of researchers is looking at compounds that attack bacteria's ability to go dormant ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.