Journal urges Ottawa to stop muzzling scientists

Mar 02, 2012
The internet homepage of the US scientific magazine Nature. Nature called on the Canadian government in an online editorial Friday to "set its scientists free" and allow them to speak about their research.

The science journal Nature called on the Canadian government in an online editorial Friday to "set its scientists free" and allow them to speak about their research.

"It is time for the to set its scientists free," Nature said in a rebuke of a "gradual tightening of media protocols for federal scientists" since Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservatives won power in 2006.

The editorial described a "confused and Byzantine approach to the press" by the Harper government, "prioritizing message control and showing little understanding of the importance of the free flow of ."

"Researchers who once would have felt comfortable responding freely and promptly to are now required to direct inquiries to a media relations office, which demands written questions in advance, and might not permit scientists to speak," it said.

"Prominent researchers have been prevented from discussing published, peer-reviewed literature."

Nature called on Ottawa to heed complaints from the Canadian Science Writers' Association and other groups critical of the "muzzling of publicly funded scientists."

These were outlined in a letter to Harper sent mid-February, which lists examples such as Environment Canada's David Tarasick being prevented from speaking to the press about his research.

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denijane
5 / 5 (1) Mar 04, 2012
""Researchers who once would have felt comfortable responding freely and promptly to journalists are now required to direct inquiries to a media relations office, which demands written questions in advance, and might not permit scientists to speak," it said."

That's ridiculous. It's hard enough to get the public interested in your research, I can't believe that the authorities intentionally prevent scientists from talking. Why?! There are sensitive researches, but they are very very few. And if something is published in peer-reviewed journal (ot any journal acutally), it's public - everybody can read it. Then why this absurd policy?!
Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (1) Mar 04, 2012
Because Canada has a Conservative government, and Conservatives are the pure ignorance and pure evil.

"That's ridiculous. It's hard enough to get the public interested in your research, I can't believe that the authorities intentionally prevent scientists from talking. Why?"
Callippo
not rated yet Mar 04, 2012
Interestingly it's just the Nature journal, which applies the most stringent rules for publications and which prohibits the scientists in presentation of their results anywhere else. Refereed Journals: Do They Insure Quality or Enforce Orthodoxy?

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