Iberdrola builds huge wind farm in US

Mar 05, 2012
Spanish energy giant Iberdrola has completed one of the world's biggest wind farms in the US state of Ohio, which will produce more than 300 megawatts of power, it said on Monday.

Spanish energy giant Iberdrola has completed one of the world's biggest wind farms in the US state of Ohio, which will produce more than 300 megawatts of power, it said on Monday.

Iberdrola "has completed construction of the Blue Creek wind farm in the United States, one of the largest such facilities in the world with installed capacity of 304 ", it said in a statement.

The farm has more than 150 huge 100-metre-high , manufactured by Spanish firm Gamesa, which can produce enough electricity to power tens of thousands of homes.

"Iberdrola has previously signed a power purchase agreement with the US firm FirstEnergy Solutions Corp for the energy generated by this facility over the next 20 years," it said.

The company said it had also started building a 189-megawatt wind farm near Rosamond, California.

Explore further: Researchers achieve 'holy grail' of battery design: A stable lithium anode

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Spain's Gamesa signs deal with Chinese firm

Sep 27, 2011

Shares in Spain's Gamesa, one of the world's top wind turbine makers, closed sharply higher Tuesday after it announced a new contract with a Chinese firm that is part of a surge in clear energy investments ...

Recommended for you

Turning bio-waste into hydrogen

17 hours ago

Whilst hydrogen cars look set to be the next big thing in an increasingly carbon footprint-aware society, sustainable methods to produce hydrogen are still in their early stages. The HYTIME project is working on a novel production ...

Economical and agile offshore construction ship

Jul 25, 2014

Siemens is currently installing the power supply and propulsion systems into a new multi-purpose offshore construction ship for Toisa Ltd. The ship, which is being built by the Korean company Hyundai Heavy ...

User comments : 19

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

javjav
5 / 5 (3) Mar 05, 2012
300 Megawatt? this is huge!

it seems that only Spain can compete against China in the wind turbines market.
Lurker2358
4.2 / 5 (11) Mar 05, 2012
it seems that only Spain can compete against China in the wind turbines market.


Only because Americans are ignorant, thanks to fools and liars, like Glenn Beck and Rush Limbaugh.

American companies could have easily made these wind farms, we have the technology and have had it for many years. It's just greed and selfishness of the existing paradigms prevents progress.

If you're big oil or big coal, you don't want cheap, clean energy available on the market, because you've already got everyone else by the nuts anyway.
ryggesogn2
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 05, 2012
Gamesa has a factory in PA.
Estevan57
1.8 / 5 (26) Mar 06, 2012
Iberdrola is one of the biggest wind power companies in the world. They are able to provide wind power at lower cost than most competitors because of their size. Small wonder they built the Ohio facility, they had the best bid.

They are planning to put up 10Gw of wind generation in the next few years. They also use local companies and labor to assemble, provide maintenance, etc.

I just don't see a real connection between Rush Limbaugh and the fact that a Spanish company built this instead of an American one.

313,126,000 people and all are ignorant because of the few who listen to Beck and Limbaugh? I don't think so.

Energy companies been building wind farms, biofuel, and solar for years.
nixnixnix
5 / 5 (2) Mar 06, 2012
300 Megawatt is not that big a wind farm these days. There are several that size already in North America and several way bigger wind farms on the way by companies from the US as well as elsewhere.

I know because I work in the industry. I could tell you names and places but then I'd have to kill me.
infinite_energy
2.3 / 5 (3) Mar 06, 2012
I am sure a viable power storage solution will emerge. The peak 300Mw power rating could be reduce to something like 200Mw continous always on power. The spikes will be buffered.
mankydp
1 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2012
I am wondering who is going to drive around in the rechargeable golf cart picking up the dead birds. I thought that vertical axis systems were on the scene a long time ago and to scale it is more affordable. Just a thought...
ryggesogn2
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 06, 2012
And don't forget the massive subsidies they have.
nixnixnix
5 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2012
Wind-farms, especially in the US, do not get subsidies. They get tax breaks (in the US this takes the form of the PTC) but so do all energy sources. The tax breaks that wind gets are insignificant compared to the tax breaks and government funding that oil and nuclear have received over the years. This idea that wind is unfairly subsidised is nonsense. You can make that argument with any energy source.
SteveL
5 / 5 (1) Mar 06, 2012
And don't forget the massive subsidies they have.
I don't care. If subsidies or governments are required to get the right things done, then so be it. Energy security for our future will require a variety of sources and technologies. "Oops!" will be an unacceptable response if we fail to provide for the future energy needs of our respective nations.

The idea that Glen or Rush have any influence concerning national energy policies especially when their opposition is in power is just silly.
ryggesogn2
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 06, 2012
"The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (H.R. 1) allows taxpayers eligible for the federal renewable electricity production tax credit (PTC) to take the federal business energy investment tax credit (ITC) or to receive a grant from the U.S. Treasury Department instead of taking the PTC for new installations. The grant is only available to systems where construction began prior to December 31, 2011. The new law also allows taxpayers eligible for the business ITC to receive a grant from the U.S. Treasury Department instead of taking the business ITC for new installations. The Treasury Department issued Notice 2009-52 in June 2009, giving limited guidance on how to take the federal business energy investment tax credit instead of the federal renewable electricity production tax credit."
A tax credit is the same as a grant, free money.
ryggesogn2
1.8 / 5 (5) Mar 06, 2012
"The biggest oil company subsidy amounting to $1.7 billion per year for the oil industry is a manufacturers tax deduction that is explained in Section 199 of the IRS code. This is a tax credit designed to keep manufacturing in the U.S., but it isnt limited to oil companies. It is a tax credit enjoyed by ethanol companies (have you ever heard anyone call it an ethanol subsidy?), computer companies (we are subsidizing Microsoft and Google!) and foreign companies that operate factories in the U.S."
http://www.consum...onmobil/
ryggesogn2
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 06, 2012
"In a nutshell, a large chunk of Big Oils subsidies are the same as those of Big Ethanol (which also has direct per gallon subsidies), Big Computer (Microsoft, Google, etc.), Big Auto, Big Pharmaceutical, and all the other industries large and small. They are not like their subsidies, they are in most cases the exact same tax deductions from the same tax code. The oil industry already pays an estimated $36 billion per year in U.S. taxes, and they have a higher tax rate than that of Microsoft or Google both companies with higher profit margins than those of the oil industry."
http://www.consum...onmobil/
How much tax is collected from wind farms?
Estevan57
1.8 / 5 (26) Mar 06, 2012
I agree with your comment SteveL. Whatever gets the right thing done and accomplished within reason is generally ok with me.

Tax Credits or a Grants, different as they may be, are acceptable compromises that can actually work in the polarized political climate of the US.

Good points, nixnixnix.

I find it amusing that many of the articles in Green and Tech have discussions hijacked into Capitalism and Big Oil and Socialism.
SteveL
not rated yet Mar 07, 2012
Upon reflection perhaps I should clarify... I do care how public money is spent. I also know that some projects and market changes require the influence of public money and public policies because they are sinply too big or important to wait for market supply and demand to eventually accomplish.

While there will always be issues like Solendra, that doesn't mean we should stop trying. We should instead do a better job of ensuring monies are used less for political purposes and more for the advancement of techologies and production - with an eye on ensuring the companies involved aren't abusing public largess.

One option is to ensure that companies can only receive public help if they haven't contributed politically in 4-5 years or so, as long as it's greater than an election cycle. If a financially troubled company is contributing to a political group or committee rather than investing in their company and people in my opinion they are poorly managed in the first place.
ryggesogn2
1.7 / 5 (6) Mar 07, 2012
too big or important to wait for market supply and demand to eventually accomplish.

When has govt responded faster than the market?
Utilities are govt regulated industries. How long did it take for the govt to change laws to allow homeowners to sell power back to the grid?
Market forces had created solar panels, batteries, inverters for home use, but govt interference slowed their implementation.
Estevan57
1.8 / 5 (26) Mar 07, 2012
"Market forces had created solar panels, batteries, inverters for home use, but govt interference slowed their implementation."

Explain how this is so please. Couldn't anyone buy solar panels the day they were made? Why not?

High costs almost always follow energy innovations, with the prices going down as economies of scale and manufacturing effiencies take hold.

If not for the tax credits that I personally get this year, I would not have installed my solar panels, or my wind generator.
They would have cost too much. Thank you government.

There has never been a law restricting sell-back of electricity to a utility to my knowledge. The hurdle has been the technology on the part of the utility distribution system. It is not designed to do this easily.

Several utilities have actually lobbied Congress to restrict the buyback so they don't have to put money into upgrading their transformers, meters, etc. Dispicable.

Good points again SteveL.
ryggesogn2
1.5 / 5 (8) Mar 07, 2012
There has never been a law restricting sell-back of electricity to a utility to my knowledge.

Do some research.
Estevan57
1.8 / 5 (26) Mar 07, 2012
In the U.S.A., as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, under Sec. 1251, all public electric utilities are now required to make available upon request net metering to their customers.

There are private utilities in 3 states and D.C. that don't provide net metering. No federal laws restricting net metering.