Harry Potter breaks e-book lockdown

Mar 27, 2012 By PETER SVENSSON , AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- The Harry Potter books are finally on sale in electronic form, and they have a special magical touch to them: In a break with industry practices, the books aren't locked down by encryption, which means consumers can move them between devices and read them anywhere they like.

If "Pottermore," J.K. Rowling's new , proves a success, it could provide a model for other authors and publishers and undermine the clout of Amazon.com Inc., which dominates e-book sales.

E-books from major publishers are sold in encrypted form today, tying them to specific devices or software programs. Publishers insist on encryption because they believe it stops piracy. It also helps e-book retailers like Amazon defend their , keeping non-Amazon books off Kindle e-readers.

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Hengine
5 / 5 (2) Mar 27, 2012
DRM does nothing but punish the "law abiding" customers. I'm confident piracy numbers will remain consistent regardless of DRM or not.