Google pays tribute to origami pioneer

March 14, 2012
A woman hangs origami in Quezon City, east of Manila, in 2010. Google paid tribute on Wednesday to the "father of the modern origami" Akira Yoshizawa by transforming its celebrated homepage logo into an homage to the folded-paper art pioneer.

Google paid tribute on Wednesday to the "father of the modern origami" Akira Yoshizawa by transforming its celebrated homepage logo into an homage to the folded-paper art pioneer.

To mark what would have been Yoshizawa's 101st birthday, the letters in Google's name are formed by folded paper shapes created by artist Robert Lang.

Lang also wrote a blog post explaining how to create the origami letters.

Yoshizawa, who died in 2005, is considered the "father of the modern origami art form," Lang said, and "pioneered many of the artistic techniques used by modern-day origami artists."

The Mountain View, California-based frequently changes the "" on its famously spartan homepage to mark anniversaries or significant events or pay tribute to artists, scientists, statesmen and others.

Explore further: Google replaces logo with dancing doodle

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Royale
not rated yet Mar 16, 2012
Guess they didn't want to pay tribute to Einstein...
Maybe next year...

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