Britain allows student's extradition to US over website

Mar 13, 2012
Sheffield student, Richard O'Dwyer, arrives at Westminster Magistrates Court in central London in January 2012. Britain has authorised the extradition to the United States of a student who created a website allowing people to watch films and television shows for free, the interior ministry said on Tuesday.

Britain has authorised the extradition to the United States of a student who created a website allowing people to watch films and television shows for free, the interior ministry said on Tuesday.

Richard O'Dwyer, a 23-year-old student at Sheffield Hallam University in , allegedly earned tens of thousands of pounds (dollars) through advertising on the TVShack website before it was closed down by US authorities.

A British judge ruled in January that O'Dwyer could be extradited to the US to answer allegations.

A spokeswoman for Britain's interior ministry, the Home Office, said on Tuesday that the government had found "no statutory bars to his surrender".

"On March 9 the Home Secretary, having carefully considered all relevant matters, signed an order for Richard O'Dwyer's to the US," she said.

O'Dwyer's mother Julia said her son was being "sold down the river" by the British government.

"If Richard appears to have committed a crime in this country, then try him in this country," she said.

The student would be the first British citizen extradited for such an offence. He faces jail if found guilty of the charges, which were brought after a crackdown by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

His lawyer had argued in court that the website did not store copyright material itself and merely directed users to other sites, making it similar to .

The lawyer also argued that his client was being used as a "" for copyright law in the United States.

The court heard that after O'Dwyer was arrested in London in November 2010, he admitted to police that he owned TVShack.net and TVShack.cc and earned about £15,000 (18,000 euros, $23,500) a month from online advertising.

Explore further: LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

British student can be extradited to US over website

Jan 13, 2012

A British student who created a website allowing people to watch films and TV shows for free can be extradited to the the US to answer copyright infringement allegations, a court ruled Friday.

U.S., British hackers face the music

May 10, 2006

Only two days after U.S. federal authorities sentenced a 21-year-old to five years in prison for hacking computers, the British government ruled that one of its citizens should be extradited to the United States for hacking ...

British teen remanded in custody over hacking

Jun 23, 2011

A British teenager charged with attacking websites as part of an international hacking group was remanded in police custody by a court Thursday while he assists a police investigation. ...

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

Apr 18, 2014

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

Apr 18, 2014

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

Apr 18, 2014

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

kaasinees
1 / 5 (2) Mar 13, 2012
Actually its the other way around, still :)
physyD
2 / 5 (4) Mar 14, 2012
Am I reading this correctly? Does this imply or set a precedent that it is now legal to now extradite a citizen for doing things in their own country what is classified by other countries as crime, whether or not it is a crime in that country? For example, if someone in Britain is part of Falun Gong, that China may request extradition to them to be punished?
Kinedryl
1 / 5 (1) Mar 14, 2012
OK, but he should be tortured at least a bit, if not jailed...
kaasinees
1 / 5 (2) Mar 14, 2012
Am I reading this correctly? Does this imply or set a precedent that it is now legal to now extradite a citizen for doing things in their own country what is classified by other countries as crime, whether or not it is a crime in that country? For example, if someone in Britain is part of Falun Gong, that China may request extradition to them to be punished?

Yes, there is a name for this treaty but i forgot how it is called, interpol or something like that?
Yep i googled and it is interpol, dont forget USA and UK are NATO/WTO members. We stopped being countries a long time ago, we are all states/nations now.

More news stories

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...

A homemade solar lamp for developing countries

(Phys.org) —The solar lamp developed by the start-up LEDsafari is a more effective, safer, and less expensive form of illumination than the traditional oil lamp currently used by more than one billion people ...

Treating depression in Parkinson's patients

A group of scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's ...